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FAIR IS A FOUR LETTER WORD AT FRENCH LICK

The second edition of this season’s Upping My Dye-Q series takes a look at The Pete Dye Course at French Lick Resort

The devilish designer himself greets visitors to The Pete Dye Course at French Lick Resort. A statue of the creator of nearly one hundred golf courses over a decades-long career stands by the bag drop. He is smiling, a friendly countenance on first impression. Alongside the sculpture is a stone adorned with a quote that ends ”…so why build a fair golf course”. After reading Pete Dye’s words, the smile doesn’t look quite so chummy. More a smirk, perhaps, or a grin that gives way to a chuckle at the travails that are about to ensue. Players have not even put on their shoes and Ol’ Pete is already trying to get in their heads.

Pete and Alice Dye have never been afraid to throw difficulty into their designs. After all, their first nine hole course included thirteen creek crossings. Tour pros have been complaining for years about being tortured by the duo on The Ocean Course to PGA West, and all points in between. However, to conclude that hard golf is what the Dyes design is to miss the point, and the complaints from fairness-loving pros speak to the reason why.

There is an adage from the Golden Age of golf architecture that the best holes appear either easier or harder than they actually are. Throughout their career, the Dyes have adhered to this principle of creating discomfort through deception. They are not simply testing a player’s ability to execute in the face of a straightforward challenge. Holes that only examine physical skills cannot test the best while remaining playable for the rest. Such design might be considered fair, but invariably, it is too easy or hard, depending on level of skill. It is also predictable and boring—two words that have never been used to describes the Dyes or their courses.

Influences of an Influencer

When Pete Dye hung up the insurance salesman suit in 1960 to don his brown work shoes and khakis, he was a far cry from having his own artistic voice. During his military service, he spent a great deal of time at Pinehurst, interacting with Donald Ross and falling in love with the No.2 course. His competitive playing career exposed him to the bold brilliance of Raynor’s Camargo and Langford & Moreau’s work throughout the Midwest. These Golden Age greats were influential, but were also being obscured at the time by Robert Trent Jones Sr. and other post-war practitioners of “heroic” design. Embarking on their architectural journey, the Dyes stood at the crossroads, not knowing exactly which way to go. The first half of the ’60s would be a formative jumping off point for the fifty years of exploration that would culminate on Mount Airie in French Lick.

In 1962, the Dyes were commissioned to build Radrick Farms in Ann Arbor, Michigan. It was a lengthy engagement with the course finally opening in 1965. During this period, two additional influences ensured that Radrick was the last Dye course to ever have an RTJ feel. The first was University of Michigan’s other course, designed by Alister MacKenzie. The second was Pete Dye’s 1963 trip to Scotland to study the great courses and history in golf’s birthplace. He came back enlightened to quirk, visual contrast and strategic design, and began working out the Dye style at Crooked Stick.

At Harbour Town in 1969, the pair took a contrarian approach with narrow playing corridors and small, angled greens. They exercised their earth moving and engineering muscle by conjuring TPC Sawgrass from the Florida swamp in 1982. By 1991, they were in full blown Dye-abolical mode at Kiawah Island’s Ocean Course. At this point in their career, a certain expectation had emerged among players and developers for what a “Pete Dye course” should be. Certain courses like Whistling Straits feel like they are in part the result of a compulsion to outdo the last hit offering, rather than further explore and evolve the artform. If a deleterious trend in the Dye’s work was developing at the turn of the century, they thankfully stamped it out by 2009.

Fairways and Greens

Pete Dye was tremendously excited to build this big budget course at the French Lick Resort, and he considered it to be among the best sites he had ever been given. Long-time Dye collaborator Tim Liddy confirmed, “Pete was enthusiastic about French Lick and heavily invested in its creation. It is the last big project to which he gave his maximum personal attention and on-site presence.” The numbers corroborate Liddy’s perspective—150 site visit made by Pete, 30 by Alice and almost 3 million cubic yards of earth moved to create 18 outstanding hilltop holes that can be stretched to 8,100 yards. The Dyes took a special opportunity, brought their expertise and willingness to push dirt, and delivered a magnum opus.

Although the scale and views are jaw-dropping, and the potential for punishment abounds, there is a subtle brilliance to the Pete Dye Course at French Lick that harkens back to Raynor, Langford, Ross and MacKenzie. Taking a look at the fairways and greens provides insight into the depth of the Dye’s design.

“Make their eyes lie to them” is a Dye family mantra, and French Lick is no exception. On many occasions, a player will stand on the tee with their eyes screaming, “There’s nowhere safe to hit it!” Holes feature a combination of fairway undulation and angled orientation that makes confidently choosing a line difficult, especially when one or both sides drop off the massive hillside. To top it off, degrees of blindness are sprinkled in, drawing upon the inspiring Scottish links of the designer’s early years. And yet students of Dye’s work know that they have provided safe landing areas for conservative and aggressive players. The eyes are lying, but those who can block that feedback out can find the fairway, and score.

Click on any gallery image below to enlarge with captions

The Pinehurst No.2 influence is evident from the first few green complexes. They are small relative to the overall scale of the course, often elevated, angled to the approaches, and shaped to allow for tucking pins. For the player looking to attack, the greens are intimidating and set up to punish reckless aggressiveness. On closer examination though, a high degree of playability is built in as well. The green fronts are open and wider. The slopes and surrounds are varied, including plentiful shortgrass maintained fast and firm by Superintendent Russ Apple and his team. Crafty players can bump-and-run or even putt their way to recovery around most of the course.

A final dose of deception is delivered on the putting surfaces. Although there are some pronounced contours, most are relatively benign. Instead subtle shaping complements the bold tee-to-green features. In this case, subtle does not mean easy though. The Dyes use the visual trick of countering green slopes to the hillsides, making reading break challenging, even on short putts. The green at French Lick confound first-timers, but also leave a desire to come back and try again.

The Pete Dye Course at French Lick is not fair, and players are all the better for it. What it is is the expression of artists who had come full circle and integrated five decades of exploration. It is a destination for players, and it would seem for Pete and Alice as well. To fully understand just how great the Dyes were at their craft, devotees must make the pilgrimage to French Lick. Like the statue with the satisfied smile, it stands as a testament to a lifetime spent climbing the circuitous route to the top of the mountain.

Copyright 2019 – Jason Way, GeekedOnGolf


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IN PRAISE OF RESTRAINT AT ROCK HOLLOW G.C.

The first edition of this season’s Upping My Dye-Q series takes a look at the Tim Liddy designed Rock Hollow Golf Club

“Who are you, and what do you do?” The direct inquiry by the local I encountered in the pro shop after completing an early-spring loop around the Tim Liddy designed Rock Hollow Golf Club caught me off guard. He must have noticed the befuddled look on my face, so he elaborated. “We saw you playing fast and carrying your bag. We know everyone who plays out here. What’s your story?” Gathering myself, I explained that I was on my way to French Lick and was taking the opportunity to see Rock Hollow, which had been on my hit list for years. After commiserating over our mutual affection for their home course, we settled in for the kind of enjoyable conversation that naturally flows among fellow geeks. Topics ranged from Chicago Golf Club to Langford & Moreau to the Pete Dye Course at French Lick, along with their beloved Rock Hollow. It was exactly the kind of community golf vibe that makes me feel right at home.

Pete’s Protege

Tim Liddy got his start at an engineering firm where he was working as a landscape architect and self-described “front end guy”. The engineers often assigned him to be the client liaison because of his skills with people and drawing. This dynamic led to an introduction to Pete Dye in 1990, resulting in his assignment to the Ocean Course project on Kiawah Island. “Pete didn’t draw plans. At that time, the permitting process required more detailed drawings,” Liddy shared. “Pete loved me because I had studied the world’s great golf holes and understood what he was talking about. It also helped that I drew well and quickly, and I didn’t mind that most of my drawings would end up in the garbage when he changed his mind. Pete started as my idol, served as my mentor, and ultimately became a father figure.” The pair’s collaboration carried on for 25 years with Pete concocting and Tim drawing.


Tim Liddy’s artistic talents on display in his digital watercolor of Rock Hollow’s 1st

Serendipity would continue to tap Tim Liddy in the early ‘90s. The Smith family, stalwarts of the game in Indiana, were looking to build a golf course and they approached Pete Dye through a mutual friend. While reviewing plans for another project at the dining room table in the Dye home, Pete made the simple suggestion, “Tim will do it.” The gears were set in motion for Liddy’s first solo design.

The Golfing Smiths

Why did the Smiths decide to build a golf course? “It’s 25 years later, and I am asking myself that same question,” joked Terry Smith, the patriarch of this golfing clan. Terry learned the game from his father, and passed it on to his three sons, Terry, Todd and Chris. All played high level competitive golf, with Chris ultimately becoming a PGA Tour winner.

The family owned a gravel and stone business that operated out of a 350+ acre quarry in Peru, IN. By 1972, the site had been mined out and sat fallow. “We left it alone to become wildlife habitat, but I felt that there could be a better use for the land,” Smith said. “Golf was such a big part of our lives, it made sense to transform the quarry into a golf course.” Clearing began in 1992, and based on Pete Dye’s recommendation, the Smith’s crew went to work under the direction of Liddy. “We had the equipment and people to handle the clearing and earthmoving, and Pete lent us a shaper to bring the finer details of Tim’s design to life.”

Creation stories tend to be romanticized, glossing over the gory details. Many golf geeks dream of building and owning their own course, and most have no comprehension of the blood, sweat and tears necessary to make that dream a reality. The story of Rock Hollow’s creation includes hints of just how tough it can be. “After unexpectedly having to top dress the entire course with soil from our farm, we found that the 7th hole was still too rocky to grow healthy turf,” recounted Smith. “Members of our family, staff and the community came out and crawled the entire length of the fairway on hands and knees picking out rocks prior to seeding.” With that level of commitment and engagement, it is no wonder that the Smiths and their neighbors remain attached to the course.

The Course

The site that would become Rock Hollow had two special characteristics on which Liddy capitalized. The mining operation created more than 50 feet of elevation change from the outer edges to the central lake—uncommon for this part of Indiana. Additionally, the site was much bigger than the golf course, allowing for the retention of that “nature preserve” feel. As Liddy described it, “Everything leads you into the natural landscape. It is like a watercolor with detail in the middle of the painting while the edges blur to support the whole.” Areas of wetland and woodland are interspersed, with the golf holes taking the player on an exploration of the land.

Rock Hollow’s nines are routed in two loops. Each begins by working around the property edge and then turning back inward to interact with the lake. The perimeter topography holds more interest, and Liddy took advantage of that variety to create a collection of holes packed with character. “One of the best things about Tim’s design is that there are no weak holes,” gushed Smith. Even after discounting his owner’s bias, I tend to agree that Rock Hollow is solid from start to finish. A unique and creative hole like the short par-4 16th, with its semi-blind approach to a green that seemingly floats on the horizon, stands out from the rest as a favorite.

Click on any gallery image below to enlarge with captions

In typical Dye fashion, Liddy employed angles, elevation changes and landforms to make the player feel uncomfortable on the tee. Confident drives are rewarded, but the best line to take is frequently not evident to the newbie visitor. Unlike some of Pete Dye’s courses, Rock Hollow has a much more understated aesthetic to accompany the strategy. “The design was a reaction to Pete’s strong personality,” Liddy explained. “The feature shapes are simple and the edges are blurry on purpose, allowing the landscape to be the focus.” This conscious restraint does not result in a bland golf course, however. To complement the natural beauty of the setting, Liddy took a hands-on approach that is evident in varied green surrounds and large, contoured putting surfaces. Rock Hollow is a course that would remain interesting, challenging and fun even after numerous plays.

Returning to the locals in the pro shop, their pride in Rock Hollow is palpable and well founded. After a period during which the conditions deteriorated, new Superintendent Larry Wilk and his team have the course looking and playing great. The design might be restrained, but the hard work and love that have gone into making Rock Hollow a terrific community golf course have been anything but. “I love golf, and it feels good to have created a place for our family to work and play the game,” Smith mused. “We took an unproductive piece of land and gave it a new use that makes people happy.” Terry Smith doesn’t say so explicitly, but I get the sense that reflecting on the joy that his course has brought to players makes the investment of blood, sweat and tears worth it.

For those in search of fun, affordable and architecturally interesting golf, Rock Hollow should be on your list. The Smith family is ready to welcome you in Peru.


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Desert Days – Sand Hollow, Paiute Wolf & Wolf Creek

Las Vegas is a regular destination for me.  My work has taken me there at least fifteen times.  With the exception of one trip that I took to get a lesson from Butch Harmon, golf has not been a part of my Las Vegas experience.  That changed this week when I decided to see what the area had to offer.

After consulting Jon Cavalier and researching Matt Ginella’s recommendations, I settled on Sand Hollow, the Wolf Course at Paiute Resort and Wolf Creek.  What an adventure I had.

A few main thoughts emerged for me as I made my way through the week, with plenty of photo taking and driving time for reflection:

  • All three courses had beautiful and dramatic settings.  When the setting is so stimulating, I question the necessity for an architect to also make the holes and features dramatic.  Doing so strikes me as unnecessary overkill that lacks in a certain amount humility.  Whether it is seaside cliffs, or mountain ridges, it seems better that at certain times the architecture takes a back seat to nature.
  • These courses highlighted the distinction between adventure golf and everyday golf.  Sand Hollow came the closest for me to everyday golf, but all three fall into the adventure golf category.  I enjoy adventure golf, and Sand Hollow, Paiute Wolf and Wolf Creek are all courses that I am grateful to have experienced.  They were visually stunning, fun to play, and full of thrill and challenge.  But they are not the kinds of courses that I could happily play every day for the rest of my life.
  • Before I die, I would love to play a bunkerless course.  This thought came to me as I made my way around Pete Dye’s Paiute Wolf.  As I examined the tee-to-green terrain and green surrounds, the grass bumps, slopes, and hollows that Pete builds are much more interesting to me than his bunkers.  The Wolf Course also had large waste areas that were really cool looking.  Between the ground features and the waste areas I would have been plenty stimulated, and I make the argument that the bunkering was a visual detractor for me.  So, to bring the thought full circle, my dream is for Pete Dye to build a bunkerless course.  His creativity would produce a wild result that would be a blast to play.

On to the photos, and a little course specific commentary…


SAND HOLLOW

SandHollow-SignHaving previously visited Zion National Park with my family, I knew that I was in for a scenic treat as I drove to St. George, UT.  The entire area is magnificent.  Sand Hollow managed to exceed my already high expectations though.  It is a MUST play golf course.

A frost delay was in effect when I arrived, but the starter soon made an exception for me because I was a walking single.  Although the back nine is an elevation changing hike, I highly recommend walking the course if possible.  The amazing terrain is much better experienced on foot.

I was happy to see that Sand Hollow had not been overseeded.  It would have looked goofy.  It was also a unique joy to play the course over semi-frozen ground.  The ball bounced and rolled, and it took all of the creative shot-making in my bag to get the ball on the greens.

The front nine meanders through the valley and eases the player into the round.  Although the holes are understated, the red clay bunkers and rock formations are striking, and they give a hint of what’s to come on the back nine.

(click on images to enlarge) 

Walking to the 10th tee, it becomes clear that the adventure has taken a new and exciting turn.  The par-3 11th, playing as a reverse redan, takes the player to the edge of the dramatic ridge along which the following holes wind.  The views are breathtaking and the golf couldn’t be more thrilling.

I ran into a ranger on the back who lives near the course.  He shared that before the course was built, he used to ride around the site on his ATV.  The ledges on which the 12th – 15th holes are built were existing, allowing the course to be routed beautifully without much earth-moving.

SandHollow12-Above

The pulse quickens on the 12th tee, and doesn’t slow down until heading back toward the clubhouse 4 glorious holes later.

I was content and happy by the time I made it to the final stretch.  As mentioned above, for me Sand Hollow’s brilliance comes from the architecture being an appropriate complement to the land.  At no time did I feel like I was experiencing sensory overload, nor did I feel like the course was in competition for my attention with the setting.  Everything fit together beautifully, and I enjoyed every minute of it.


PAIUTE WOLF

The Wolf Course at Las Vegas Paiute Resort plays entirely in the valley.  Unlike Sand Hollow, which interacted with the mountains and featured significant elevation changes, Paiute Wolf plays over mostly flat ground.  That is not to say that the Wolf is uninteresting though, because Pete Dye added his creative flair to provide plenty of variety, visual intimidation and confusion.

The morning I played was another cold one and the ground remained frozen until well into the back nine.  Paiute Wolf was not quite as fun to play in the extremely firm conditions.  Many of the greens were designed to be approached from the air, and the required shots simply would not hold because of the conditions.  The day I played, the wind was up, but not as much as it normally is in the exposed valley.  I would love to get another crack at the Wolf under normal conditions to get the full experience, wind included.

Paiute Wolf features a wide and wonderful variety of greens – elevations, sizes, shapes, orientations.  They are interesting and cool.  One thing that they are not is severe, either in their internal contouring or canting, and so they are also very puttable.  I can imagine that after a few plays, it would be possible to make a lot of putts.

PaiuteWolf9-ShortRight

#9 – Par 4

I played with an older gentleman who didn’t hit it far, but did hit it consistently straight.  He knew the course and was able to plot his way around effectively.  This speaks to the thoughtfulness that the Dyes infused into the course.  There is strategy in the design, but that strategy is inclusive of all strength levels.  Execution is still required, but if a player can pick a line and hit it on that line, they can navigate the hazards and score.

Paiute Wolf is great fun off the tee, specifically because of the angles created by the size and placement of hazards.  Risk-taking is tempted, and the choice is left in the player’s hands to bite off as much of each hole as they can chew.

PaiuteWolf14-Tee

#14 – Par 4

As was the case at Sand Hollow, I was thoroughly content as I finished up at the Wolf.  The course provided challenge, but only as much as I wanted to take on.  The features were quirky and cool, and the setting was gorgeous.  It wasn’t necessarily about “wow”, but it was a wonderful morning of golf.


WOLF CREEK

Insane.  That is the word that best describes Wolf Creek for me.  It is one of those courses that it is hard to believe someone had the compulsion to build.  For that reason alone – the sheer crazy coolness of it – it is a must play for every golf geek.

I took quite a few photos, and I will let them mostly speak for themselves.  From the first tee, the course is a visual concert of color and texture cranked to 11.  A visit to Wolf Creek is as much about seeing it as playing it.

A few words about the architecture of Wolf Creek though.  It is not strategic.  It is penal.  Hit the shots where you are supposed to, and there are chances to score.  Miss those spots, and you are dead.  There is very little in between.  The conditions were wet and lush the morning I played.  I made good (and a few lucky) choices on line and distance off the tee, executed, and I was rewarded with relatively easy approaches.  Once safely off the tee, the rest of my round was pleasant and not terribly demanding.  It is easy to see though, for those who cannot carry the ball 200+ yards in the air, or who are hitting it crooked, a day at Wolf Creek could be torture.


As I headed home from Las Vegas, I was struck by the variety I encountered on my golf adventure.  I’m not sure that the same variety exists within the city and suburbs.  My willingness to drive a bit was rewarded with an amazing array of color, terrain, architecture and the tired satisfaction of having broadened my golf geek horizons.

What’s my recommendation?  Grab a flight and then hit the road.  There is golf adventure to be had outside of Las Vegas that is well worth the effort, and not to be missed.


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Copyright 2015 – Jason Way, GeekedOnGolf


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A 1,537 Mile Drive – The Fort, Hyde Park, Camargo, French Lick, Harrison Hills

My schedule worked out such that I had a few days to hit the open road for golf adventure.  With much appreciated help from Tim Liddy and Jason Thurman, a tour through Indiana and Ohio came together which allowed me to add to my experience of Ross, Raynor, Dye, and Langford (with a healthy dose of Liddy).

Each of these architects practiced the craft of design and construction differently to my eye.  Raynor and Langford, through the lens of the engineer, produced features that are elegant in their simultaneous simplicity and boldness.  Ross and Dye, with the flourish of the artist, blended their creative vision with the landscape.  All used masterful routings across the rolling land to deliver beauty, interest, challenge and a sense of profound joy for me as a I walked the fairways.

Before diving into the photos and commentary, it is worth mentioning that the trip was bookended with golf at my dad’s community golf course in Galesburg, IL where I had the pleasure of whacking it around with Pops and my little guys.  I would trade any of these top-tier golf experiences for a chance to walk with my dad and watch my boys discover the joy of this great game.  For me, that golf is in a class high above the Top 100.

Tim has graciously offered to add his commentary.  I will post it shortly.


THE FORT

Round 1 was supposed to be at Harrison Hills, but they had storm damage, so I hit The Fort instead.  I found out after the round that Tim Liddy worked extensively with Pete Dye on the course.

Having only played the ASU course prior to this, I am inexperienced with Pete Dye’s work (other than what I see in pictures and on TV).  I was surprised to find a course that had plenty of interest as it moved over the rolling terrain without feeling overly manufactured.  The bunkering, greens, and green surrounds had splashes of creativity, but that creativity fit into the landscape nicely.

The course is in a State Park that was previously the Army’s Fort Benjamin Harrison.  It feels remote (a la Bethpage), which I always enjoy, even though it is in the suburbs of Indianapolis.  There was plenty of space to make big holes, and the course has a set of four par 5s that I absolutely loved, including back-to-back 5s on the front nine.  Those holes were gettable, but not without solid strategy and execution.

Sadly, I don’t feel like I got to experience all of the fun of bounces and rolls that were possible because the course was so water-logged.  I’m not sure I would go so far as to say that The Fort was designed with fast-and-firm foremost in mind, but I would say that it would be a blast to play on a drier day.


HYDE PARK GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB

HydePark-Clubhouse

Hyde Park’s Clubhouse as seen beyond the ravine that dissects the 12th hole.

Prior to the trip, I had heard from several people that Hyde Park was underrated.  I expected to like it because I am a Ross guy, but what I found was that underrated is an understatement.  The work that Tim Liddy, Eric O’Bryan, and Pat O’Brien have done to restore the course is as good as any that I have seen.

The first hole is relatively straightforward and is a gentle setup for what is about to come.  Heading to the 2nd tee, one gets a first glimpse of how the routing will use the hills and ravines and it is simply breathtaking.  Hyde Park’s #2-7 is an all-world stretch of holes (and #10-15 is no slouch either).  The course is routed using the hills to provide elevation changes and quite a few high-to-high shots, which I find thrilling.

The big picture is outstanding, but the course might be even better in the details.  For example:

  • Use of straight lines on tee boxes, fairway grass lines, and green fronts is a really cool contrast to the natural roll of the land.
  • The variety of Ross bunkers are beautifully placed and shaped, with some dug down to create scale, and others built up.
  • Greens are extended out the edges of the green pads, which I find to be a really neat, classic look.
  • The green contours are mostly subtle, but tricky and fun nonetheless.  I suspect that it takes a long time to really learn those greens.
  • Tree management at the course is terrific.  The course has beautiful, old specimen trees galore, but it does not feel over-treed.
  • The fairways are Zoysia, which was so pleasant to play.  Dear Lord, please let me play on fairways like that when I am an old man.

Even without the strongest finishers on each nine, I was still blown away.  As an every day course, it doesn’t get much better than Hyde Park.


THE DONALD ROSS COURSE AT FRENCH LICK

RossCourse-OpeningView

A first glimpse of the golf to come literally takes the breath away.

I read reviews and looked at numerous photos of the Ross Course.  I expected it to be gorgeous because every photo I have seen of the place is beautiful.  Walking out to the first tee, and seeing the course laid out across the land, I realized that the pictures don’t do it justice.

Most of the greens are on high points on the property, which achieves two objectives: 1) the course plays mostly uphill, adding to its challenge, and 2) each hole culminates with another beautiful vista.  It’s like getting a little reward for surviving the climb.

The challenge of the Ross Course just begins upon reaching the greens.  The contours were the wildest I have ever seen on a Ross design, and they were a blast to putt.  On quite a few holes, my playing partner and I lingered to try some of the putts that would result from approaches hit to the wrong section of the green.  I could have spent hours…

The bunker variety and placement is just right, and the color-contrasts of fairways, bunkers, and tall grass are simply sublime.  It is no wonder that a course that looks like a work of fine art in color and composition is so photogenic.

It’s a general theme here that I would like another chance to play these courses in drier conditions.  There is little doubt in my mind that the weather had taken some of the teeth out of the Ross Course the day I played it.  Playing dry and firm, look out.


HARRISON HILLS GOLF & COUNTRY CLUB

After playing two stellar Rosses and a legendary Raynor earlier in the week, I thought that I might be out of WOWs by the time I reached Harrison Hills early on my final day.  William Langford and Tim Liddy proved me wrong with their 71-years-apart collaboration.

I had heard about the course from Dan Moore and others, and after playing Lawsonia Links in the Spring, I was excited for the round.  Tim challenged me to determine which holes he did in his expansion of the course.  I got 17.5 right….  I won’t share the answers here – go play the course and see for yourself.

The distinction between the Langford and Liddy holes is not so much one of design as it is a feel of age.  Tim’s holes just feel newer.  With proper tree and turf management over the next 20-30 years though, I suspect that it will be nearly impossible to distinguish who did what.


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Copyright 2015 – Jason Way, GeekedOnGolf


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Architects Week II is in the books. Now for the show…

Once again, the folks at Golf Channel have put together a nice Architects week feature.  Matt Ginella continues to evolve as a voice for the good of the game, giving us a break from Tour & Tip coverage, to help us connect to the soul of the game – golf courses and the people who create them.

A WALK THROUGH THE WEEK

 

“The more I learn about architecture, the more I want to know.” – Matt Ginella

The week kicked off with a preview from Matt, Geoff Shackelford, and a panel.  Bill Coore was originally slated to start off the week, but dropped of the agenda at the last minute.  Such are the lives of successful men, perhaps.

“Think of golf holes as human. You are wrestling with another animate object.” – Robert Trent Jones, Jr.

After a visit with Tom Weiskopf and discussion of his recent updates to TPC Scottsdale, next up was Robert Trent Jones, Jr.  It was an interesting segment with the veteran architect that culminated with discussion of Chambers Bay, the 2015 U.S. Open venue which promises to be a strong follow-up to last year’s game-changing event at the renovated Pinehurst #2.  “It is both the aerial game and the ground game,” said Jones of Chambers.  Clearly, he is excited to the see the best golfers in the world take on his course.

“Let the land speak and lay golf holes out that were relatively straightforward.” – David McLay Kidd

The old guard gave way to members of the next generation of great architects – David McLay Kidd, Mike DeVries and Gil Hanse.  This trio has already produced a portfolio of amazing courses, including my home course the Kingsley Club.  They are also working on some of the most exciting projects in golf – Sand Valley #2, Cape Wickham, The Rio Olympic Course, and now Streamsong Black.

“He’s so creative. He’s a real sculptor with the Earth.” – Alice Dye on Pete

A full day was given to Pete & Alice Dye, perhaps the most influential duo in golf course architecture history, not to mention a heart-warming story of love and marriage partnership.  Geoff Shackelford said of Mr. Dye, “He was sort of a change agent; that will ultimately be his legacy.”  Hard to argue with that assessment.

“It’s something I’ve had on the back burner for 20 years.” – Tom Doak

The week wrapped up with Tom Doak sharing what might be the most exciting thing to happen to architecture since C.B. MacDonald realized his “ideal hole” architecture at National Golf Links of America.  The reversible course at Forest Dunes.

The architects segments were great, as was the commentary between Matt and Geoff, and I highly recommend combing through the clips as a means to find leads to take you on further explorations into the field of golf course architecture.

There are really only three things that disappointed me about this second Architects Week:

  1. The lack of new faces, other than Mike DeVries.  I understand the need for the big names to keep the ratings up and the momentum going for GCA coverage.  In spite of that reality, it would have been nice to have more international representation, and a no-less-talented, but lower-profile architect or two.
  2. The lack of “field time”.  The modern minimalists who are at the forefront of architecture today like Tom Doak, Mike DeVries and others consistently point to the field as the place where the rubber hits the road in GCA.  Driving a bulldozer, shaping the sandy earth, doing the finishing hand work – generally playing in the dirt – this is where architectural magic happens.  Although I love the interviews and the routing discussions, it would have been great to see Matt strolling and chatting with at least one architect on-site.
  3. The segments were just too darn short.  There was not a single segment on the show that didn’t leave me wanting more.  Much more.  At a certain level, good entertainment leaves you wanting more.  But golf architecture coverage goes beyond entertainment.  Given the time appropriate for a subject with the depth and breadth of GCA, it could be educational and inspirational.  It could truly expand the horizons of the audience, and connect them more deeply to the soul of the game.

 

I have made my argument for a regular GCA show on Golf Channel in this previous post.  Architects Week just reinforced my commitment to keep agitating until this gets done.

For now though, you can get your GCA fix on GolfClubAtlas.com, and here at the ever-expanding Geeked On Golf GCA Video Archive.


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GEEKED ON GOLF VIDEO ARCHIVE

A comprehensive collection of links to golf course architecture and history videos

It is exciting to see increased discussion of golf course architecture on Golf Channel and other televised golf coverage, with Matt Ginella and Geoff Shackelford leading the way.  Perhaps some day, we will see the GCA show I argued for in this previous post – The Art of Course.

In the meantime, this video link archive has been created to be a resource for all those who want in-depth exploration of golf courses, architecture and history.  Many thanks to my collaborator Kyle Truax (on Twitter @TheTruArchitect) for his extensive contributions to this archive.

A few words about the format and structure of the archive: Wherever possible, a playlist on my YouTube channel has been created for each subject, and can be played right from this page.  Links to videos from sources other than YouTube have also been provided, with hyperlinks in the video titles.

With proliferation of GCA-related videos, the original single page format was getting to be a bit unruly.  I split the archive into three parts.

GOLF COURSES

All golf course specific video links have now been moved to the GeekedOnGolf Global Guide.

GOLF COURSE ARCHITECTS

This page features architect interviews, presentations, etc. that are not course specific to a single course.  See the Architect videos here…

GCA COMMENTATORS

This page features the Golf Channel architecture features, as well as videos from other commentators and architecture enthusiasts.  See the Commentators videos here…

If you have any clips to add, please feel free to tweet them me at @JasonWay1493 or leave them here in the comments.  Enjoy!

 

 

 

Copyright 2019 – Jason Way, GeekedOnGolf