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INFINITELY INTERESTING – KINGSLEY CLUB

An in-depth look at Mike DeVries’s brilliant design at Kingsley Club

Our conversation was supposed to be focused on Mike’s thoughts about Kingsley as it approaches its 20th birthday. Before I knew what had happened, he had flipped the spotlight on to me and how my experience of the course has evolved over the years of playing it regularly. We did eventually get to his perspective, and in the process, I gained further insight into what makes Mike DeVries a great architect. Like all good designers, he studies the land and draws from a mental database of feature and hole ideas to lay out a course. There is an extra dimension that makes Mike special though. He is genuinely interested in how players experience a course. Not only those who play like he does and not only good players—he thinks about ALL players and he strives to create courses that engage them, regardless of how they play the game.

Taking into account that range of factors—the land, routing, strategy, aesthetic beauty, interesting features, drainage, agronomy, maintenance functionality, and the potential shots that any golfer of any skill level might hit—is a tall order. In fact, it is beyond the capability of a person with average mental computing power to handle. Mike DeVries is a world-class architect because he has that power and he cares to use it in pursuit of creating golf courses that will hold their interest over time and repeat play. That is what he accomplished at Kingsley Club, and that is fundamentally why I love it now more than ever.

Great or Not at All

Spend any time with Ed Walker, and it quickly becomes clear that sitting still is not his thing. His gears turn and he stays in motion, so it comes as no surprise that when faced with the choice between the waiting list at Crystal Downs and building his own course, he opted for the latter. That decision was by no means a repudiation of Dr. MacKenzie and Perry Maxwell’s northern Michigan masterwork. Quite the contrary. Walker and his partner Art Preston sought counsel from Fred Muller, long-time Crystal Downs professional, who suggested Mike DeVries. “I spent thousands of days at The Downs, playing with family and working on the grounds crew,” recalled DeVries. “Every day I was there, I learned something about architecture.”

The group of men began to explore a piece of land that Walker and Preston had access to in the fall of 1998, with DeVries working on various routings. “Art and Ed just wanted a great golf course, and I wanted to create an experience like The Downs,” DeVries recounted. “We agreed that if we couldn’t meet that standard with that land, we wouldn’t build it at all. We’d go find a parcel where we could.” With an adventurous and walking-focused routing finally determined, construction began. The front nine was completed in 2000 and the back nine in 2001.

DeVries drew upon his home course for inspiration at Kingsley, and he also looked to the Home of Golf. “The Old Course is a riddle that players have to unlock,” said DeVries. “My goal was for Kingsley to have that same quality. It is very playable, but not simple.” The kind of design that he delivered only reaches its full potential if the right agronomic and conditioning choices are made though. “Fortunately, the ownership and membership care more about how the turf plays than how it looks,” explained DeVries. “When it comes to growing fast and firm fescue, (Superintendent) Dan Lucas is a genius.”

The course was more than a decade old when I first experienced it in 2013. After a full season of play, it inspired me to share a novice perspective on what captured my attention and heart—the interest, variety and beauty. Looking back on those early impressions, they were on point for me at the time. But the question remained, after several more years during which I would see many of America’s greatest courses, would Kingsley’s stature endure? Would it continue to hold my interest when compared to the best among its contemporaries, as well as the works of the Golden Age masters?

Exploring the Depths

Mike DeVries has gone on to design and build other outstanding courses including Greywalls at Marquette Golf Club and Cape Wickham, in addition to his noteworthy retrovation work at classics like Meadow Club. His experience in his craft has broadened and deepened. With that perspective, how does he feel about Kingsley today? “I’m still super excited about it,” he responded without hesitation. He continues to enjoy watching players pick their lines and navigate the slopes of the greens and surrounds. What thrills him most is encapsulated in an early encounter. “Dan Lucas and I were out in a cart checking grass lines and discussing work to be done,” he recalled. “We came upon two members, one of whom played a lot of golf at a course that was more about execution than strategic thought. He stopped us to excitedly share how Kingsley changed his perspective, with all the shots to try and figure out.” DeVries chuckled as he told the story, satisfied in the surety that these and so many subsequent golf souls have been brought to the light.

As Mike talked, he illuminated how my own paradigm has shifted over the years and numerous loops around the course. After my initial introduction to Kingsley, I knew it was a riddle, but I still believed that it could be solved. I now see that the right answer to the question, “What’s the best way to play this hole?” is always, “It depends.” It depends on the day’s pin position, the weather, the wind, the time of day, and the stiffness and fatigue of my muscles. Add to those variables a brilliant design and the rub of the green delivered by the ball bouncing over firm turf, and there is truly no bottom to the well of Kingsley’s variety. The happiness of playing the course does not come from solving the riddle, but rather from the experience of trying.

Further, I understand Mike’s enjoyment of watching others play. It is my great pleasure to host fellow geeks at Kingsley. There is joy in watching these newbies take on the challenges of the course, with a mixed bag of victories and defeats a veritable certainty. I used to act as tour guide, explaining what I thought my comrades should do on each hole. These days, I try to keep my mouth shut, preferring to observe their voyage of discovery. Perhaps it’s mischievous to watch ping pong between the bunkers on the 2nd or a putt seemingly breaking uphill on the 12th without offering guidance. Kingsley is full of mischief, so I offer my apologies (and condolences) for hosting in a similar vein. To date, it has proven far better for each visitor to take their own dive into Kingsley’s depths.

The Course

Kingsley was initially intended to be walking only. It has evolved to allow for cart traffic, as well as other minor changes. Astute observers will note some of the differences between the original course map and the course today.

What remains the same are the wild movement of the land and the bold green complexes that give the course its character.

The seasons in northern Michigan are distinct and the weather is highly variable. Kingsley draws a moody personality from its setting. In the photo tour that follows, I am assisted by Jon Cavalier (@LinksGems) and Noah Jurik (@Noah_Jurik) in bringing you those moods.

Click on any gallery image to enlarge with captions

As players stand on the elevated 1st tee with a giant center bunker staring them in the face, they often voice a question that is a theme. “Where am I supposed to hit it?” The par-5 plays over that hill down into a valley, and then back up to a two-tiered green in a partial bowl. The 2nd is a short par-3 that runs along one of the several dune ridges of an area known as the “south forty”. First-timers have the easiest time with this tee ball, as they don’t yet carry the scar tissue associated with missing the tiny green.

The next two four-pars run back and forth over undulating ground. The 3rd swings gently right to an angled green that plays like an inverted biarritz. The 4th is straightaway over a heaving fairway to an enormous putting surface in a bowl. Players don’t know if they have found the same section as the hole until they crest the fronting ripple. Quite the thrill ride!

The par-3 5th has some pins that are easy to access, and others that are nearly impossible. Regardless, it is always fun to throw a ball onto the left hillside and watch it scoot across the green. After conquering yet another sloped dune on the par-4 6th, players face what appears to be a benign approach. Arriving at the greensite, however, they find that shots left or long fall far away down steep slopes.

The stretch of the 7th through the 9th hugs a ridge created by two tall dunes on the west side of the property. On both the par-5 7th and par-4 8th, DeVries used the topography to create partial blindness and awkward angles. The one-shot 9th has a green that looks like a spaceship landed below the clubhouse when viewed from the hilltop tee boxes. Holes in one are a regular occurrence—almost as regular as double-pars.

After making the turn, players begin a journey into a new section of the site on the 10th. This two-shotter lays out simply and works its way up to a green at grade. Subtle internal contours often lead to head scratching on the putting surface. The par-3 11th has a canted green with easy hole locations front left and crazy tough ones back right. Many a pin seeking tee ball ends up tumbling off the right slope.

The lay-of-the-land 12th tumbles downhill with nary a bunker in sight. The thrill of hoisting a shot up against the blue sky from the elevated tee and then watching it float down to the fairway below is one of the most exhilarating on the course. The drivable par-4 13th offers players options off the tee and one of the boldest greens they’ll ever see, featuring high front and rear plateaus with a low bowl in the middle.

The tee shot on the par-5 14th is semi-blind to a fairway that turns right and then heads downhill. The tiered green is set in a nook between bunkers and a stone wall. The 15th turns back to climb uphill, providing Kingsley’s stoutest challenge. Hitting the angled and elevated green with one’s second shot demands precision on both the line and distance. The wooded stretch concludes with Kingsley’s redan-esque 16th, taking the player back up to a high point.

The rollercoaster par-5 17th begins the closing stretch. Tee shots that carry the hill run down far enough to leave a short second into the green, making birdie or better a real possibility. DeVries tests players with one final strategic par-4 on the home hole. Ideal position off the tee is dictated by the pin which can be in the open left, or tucked right side of the green. Until the very end, the mind and swing are fully engaged.

Back when I penned my first impression of Kingsley Club, I was eager to get to know the course much better. At the same time, there was a tinge of concern that someday I would arrive in the parking lot and not feel the same excited anticipation for the adventure ahead. Today, that fear is gone. The infinite interest of the course, painstakingly built by Mike DeVries and expertly presented by Dan Lucas’s team, is sure to engage me and other lucky visitors for decades to come.

Copyright 2019 – Jason Way, GeekedOnGolf


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FROM CHRISTMAS TREES TO GREEN FEES AT CHAMPION HILL

The story of the Stone family’s Northern Michigan journey into golf course construction and ownership at Pinecroft and Champion Hill

“Are you going to play Champion Hill this time?” My golf buddy Ben knew that I was making trips to Northern Michigan and he would text me this question every time I posted a photo of Kingsley Club, Arcadia Bluffs or Crystal Downs. “It’s on my list,” I would reply. Not a lie, but a truth lacking in any sense of urgency. I was busy getting intimate with three of the best courses in the state, the region, and perhaps even America (depending on who you ask). What need did I have of seeing a country course, even if it was a favorite of the locals? After years of this exchange, I finally made the short trip, and by the time I reached the fourth tee it was clear why Ben was so insistent. Champion Hill is a joy of a course with hand-crafted architectural feel on a piece of land that is as good as The Downs—all at a green fee that makes you feel like you’re taking advantage of the family who owns it.

Do You Think We Might Have Something?

The Stones have been a farming family for generations, growing cherries and other fruit, along with Christmas trees. City folk might not give much thought to where those firs, pines and spruce come from. Thank growers like the Stones. By the late ‘80s, tree farming had become a grind as big box stores squeezed producers and pushed out independent tree lots. The family was getting by but feeling the pressure, prompting Lee Stone to begin contemplating other uses for the land.

In college, Stone had taken a golf class and then played with his father at the courses around Benzie County throughout his twenties and thirties. To call him an avid golfer would be a stretch, and he certainly didn’t have any experience in designing or building courses. He was, however, on the lookout for opportunity, which materialized in the morning queue at the Signal Hill Golf Course in Panama City Beach, FL. Stone shared the story of inspiration hitting while on a family vacation with NewClub’s Matt Considine on the Bag Drop Podcast. “Standing there with a bunch of guys and it wasn’t even light yet,” he recounted. “I thought, maybe that’s what we do with the farm up north. That was the start of it.”

The Stones might not have had a golf pedigree, but they did have land in what has come to be seen as one of the ideal places in America to build a golf course. Northern Michigan’s trademark sandy soil and glacier-made topography characterized their property. Lee connected with Jim Cole, who left turf school at Ohio State to work on construction of the courses at Agaming and Crystal Mountain. Cole had a landscaping company at the time, but agreed to take a look at the land that would become the family’s first course, Pinecroft. “What do you say Jim, do you think we might have something here?” The answer came back strongly in the affirmative. Testing from Michigan State confirmed that the soil was perfect for golf, requiring only stripping, screening and seeding. Cole and the Stones set to work clearing, shaping, and installing irrigation, doing nearly everything in-house. Pinecroft opened for play in 1992 and the tee sheet filled up immediately.

The magnificent lake view from the 16th green at Pinecroft

Let’s Do Another

Pinecroft was a resounding success with locals and golf tourists alike. Lee Stone was pleased with the result, and upon reflection found the process of building the course to be highly enjoyable and satisfying. He proposed to Cole that they create a second course on another site owned by the family. The 350 acres that became Champion Hill sits on the highest point in Benzie County with views of Crystal Lake and Lake Michigan in the distance. A setting that rivals its much more famous neighbor in Frankfort.

By the time clearing began in 1995, Stone and Cole had augmented their hands-on experience with study of the subjects of architecture, construction and agronomy. The pair agreed to a simple set of timeless design principles for their second offering: an open, airy feeling with wide fairways; no trees or water hazards in play; natural, sand-pit style bunkering; big, contoured greens. In rural Michigan, they had organically settled on the formula that would also captivate golfers in the sand hills of Nebraska, along the coast of Oregon, and beyond.

Stone hopped on the family’s new bulldozer and did most of the shaping himself between 1996 and 1998. He likes to tell the story of meeting an up-and-coming architect named Mike DeVries, who stopped by to see the project and offer his services. Stone politely turned DeVries down because he was having too much fun doing it himself. What was born of necessity came to be permeated with a joy that players still feel twenty years later.

The Course

Champion Hill is a course that achieves the holy grail of playability. Interesting, challenging and fun for players of all ages and abilities. With holes working up, along and over a primary ridge, the hilly terrain makes for a tough but doable walk. Stone and Cole stayed largely true to their design principles. Trees are part of the scenery, but with the exception of a few nods to the orchard heritage of the land, they are not on the stage. There is enough strategy baked into the design to satisfy geeks and sticks alike, and enough quirk to charm even the well-traveled.

Click on any gallery image below to enlarge with captions

The round begins with three consecutive par-4s that work up to the high ground. The 1st is straightaway, the 2nd banks left around a large set of bunkers, and the 3rd is an up-and-over to a green set at the base of a hill. This opening stretch introducers players to the naturalized aesthetic and the wonderful contours to come. It culminates with a green-back view of both lakes that is worthy of a brief pause to absorb.

The 4th is a bunkerless par-4 that runs along the base of the dune, providing plenty of challenge in spite of its lack of a hazard. The par-5 5th features a dramatic downhill tee shot to a sharp dogleg right. Deciding how aggressive to be with that corner gets tricky at elevation. The first one-shotter on the course, the 6th plays over a valley to a green benched into the hillside.

The short par-5 7th is a stunning example of lay-of-the-land architecture. The tee shot is downhill into a valley. Players are then faced with an uphill approach to a lay-up area and green that are defended by sneaky tough bunkers. The putting surface is large and can be held with longer clubs, but is contoured to make lag putting no bargain.

After the 7th, the course comes up over the ridge to begin the descent to the turn. The 8th is a picturesque par-3 with a shelf green and expansive views. The 9th once again asks players to choose a line down to a fairway set at an angle along the foot of the hill. Upon making the turn, the 10th is a simple but tough four-par with a very deep green.

The par-3 11th is one of the most heavily bunkered on the course and can be a card wrecker when the wind is howling. Not to be outdone, the green on the two-shot 12th has devilish contours that give players fits. The final par-3 on the course, the 13th requires a stout tee ball while dealing with the distraction of the breathtaking vista from the high point of the property.

The next two par-4s are among the most creative and strategic holes on the course. Anything from a mid-iron to a driver works off the tee on the 14th, with its drivable green perched near the top of the ridge. The 15th requires that players check the hole location as a small tree fronts an offset green that runs away. Angle of approach is critical to set up a birdie chance.

The closing stretch begins with the par-4 16th, which plays over a rise and then down to a deep, well-defended green. Back-to-back par-5s complete the round. The 17th swings right around an orchard and the 18th includes the only water on the course, short left of the home green.

Listening to Lee Stone discuss his creations with Matt Considine, the discomfort he feels being the focal point is evident. Pay close attention and you can also pick up flashes of confidence and pride. He knows that the collaboration with his old friend Jim yielded a gem at Champion Hill. Best of all is the satisfaction that he expresses knowing how much players have enjoyed his courses over the years. Go play Pinecroft or Champion Hill and you will feel like you’re a part of that great, big golfing family.

As is the case with family farms, many family owned golf courses are struggling to survive. If we want the best of these courses, like Champion Hill, to be around for the long haul, we have to seek them out and play them regularly. Don’t do it out of charity, though. Do it because it is a golf experience that is much richer than the shots hit on the course.

Copyright 2019 – Jason Way, GeekedOnGolf


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WHERE ENTHUSIASM LIVES – CAL CLUB

An in-depth look at the course and culture at California Golf Club of San Francisco

En·thu·si·asm – /in-TH(y)oozē-azəm/ – definition: intense and eager enjoyment – root: Greek en theos, roughly translated as possessed by spirit, or inspired. Lofty language, but fitting to describe the membership at California Golf Club of San Francisco, as well as the effect of spending time with them on their outstanding golf course. Cal Club is a place where enthusiasm for the game of golf, and for life itself, is alive and well.

To be clear, Cal is a golf club. The golf course is the focal point, and walking golf is the only activity of interest, at least during daylight. The beautiful land on which the course sits, and its eclectic architectural history, combine to produce an intensely enjoyable playing experience.

Architectural (r)Evolution

Many noteworthy hands have touched the course at Cal Club over the years and the it has evolved considerably. The changes serve as a reminder that no golf course ever remains static—ebbs and flows occur along the way.

In 1924, the club acquired the land in South San Francisco that would become its permanent home. Willie Locke was initially retained by CGCSF to design their new course. Locke came to America with many other turn-of-the-century immigrant professionals who were busily trying to keep up with the burgeoning demand for the game in the post-Ouimet U.S. Open era. He played a part in the development of several Bay Area courses, including nearby Lake Merced. Unfortunately for Locke, his tenure at Cal Club was short. He completed a routing, but was replaced after only two days by A.V. Macan. Macan was an Irishman who made a name for himself designing courses in British Columbia and the Pacific Northwest. Although most of Locke’s routing was incorporated into the final design of the course that ultimately opened in 1926, changes were material enough that Macan was given sole credit. Not long thereafter, the club turned to the duo of Dr. Alister MacKenzie and Robert Hunter for an aesthetic upgrade. The pair was turning heads with their work from Meadow Club in Marin, down to the Monterey Peninsula. Bunkers were completely redesigned and rebuilt, as were the 10th and 18th greens.

The course remained largely unchanged until the 1960s, when the city claimed the northern portion of the club’s property to build a road. Robert Trent Jones was brought in to do a reconfiguration. Although CGCSF was still considered a fine test of golf, an ominous trend was set in motion that continued through the ‘70s, ‘80s and ‘90s. The golfing culture of the club was weakened and its golf IQ diminished. In these conditions, well-meaning members tinkered in a similar fashion to that which befell many classic courses in America. The character of the Locke-Macan-MacKenzie-Hunter creation was nearly lost in the clutter of additions and alterations.

Enter a group of passionate and committed members led by past-Director Al Jamieson who decided the time had come to take Cal Club back to its roots. They were aided in the endeavor by accomplished historian David Normoyle. In his terrific interview with Andy Johnson on The Fried Egg podcast, Jamieson detailed the trials and tribulations of getting the project underway, as well as the results. Cal’s leadership settled on architect Kyle Phillips, a veteran with acclaimed original and renovation work around the world. According to club lore, he earned the job with his idea to utilize a dramatic ridge for a new 7th hole, but Jamieson explained that it was Phillips’s presence that convinced the committee. “In 2005, we interviewed ten architects…Kyle Phillips clearly won the day with his presentation, his demeanor, his maturity and his background. He made us think outside the box.”

What was originally conceived as a necessary replacement of the course’s greens morphed into a full scale “retrovation”, as Normoyle labels it. “Cal Club is absolutely one of the leaders in the clubhouse when it comes to not accepting what you were, and not accepting what you are, but trying to imagine the best you can possibly be, and having the willingness to take the risk to find out what that is,” he said. Upon reopening in 2008, and every day since, players have been nearly unanimous in their assessment that that risk paid off, huge.

Cal Club Today

With names on the lockers like Eddie Lowery, Ken Venturi and Arron Oberholser, and a robust local and national membership that is very well-traveled, it is an understatement to say that this group is woke. Their collective finger is directly on the pulse of what makes the game great at this level. A frequent refrain from the initiated is that the bar at Cal Club is the best hang in golf as well. It is a place where you can find yourself in a discussion about the nuances of golf course architecture, or just as easily witness a debate about which Dead show had the best rendition of Morning Dew. Fitting for the Bay Area, birthplace of the counter-culture movement as well as the home of a collection of golf courses that are among the finest on the planet.

The debate about Dead shows and songs will remain unsettled for now as we are seeking further insight into just what makes the culture at Cal Club so special. Certainly, the place is jammed with golf-crazed bon vivants, but there is more to it than this surface impression. The membership supports youth and competitive golf. It is not uncommon to see kids with their parents, high school golfers and players from Cal or Stanford walking the fairways. And if that accommodating attitude weren’t enough, the club has a special membership designation for the highest caliber aspiring players. Named after the Bay Area’s native son, the Venturi membership gives access to the facilities to top players who need a home base. Playing skills are not enough to become a Venturi though. Candidates undergo a rigorous interview process to ascertain the quality of their character. 2019 has been a particularly good year for alumni of the program with Martin Trainer earning his first PGA Tour win and Isaiah Salinda among the nation’s top collegiate players. Cal Club members don’t just talk the “grow the game” talk, they walk the walk.

Speaking of walking, the club has a strong walking culture. Players are welcome to tote their own sticks, use a trolley, or take one of the great caddies. The point is to experience the course on foot while enjoying the interaction among players that is lost when zooming around a course in carts. The strong culture was built one step at a time, and those steps continue today.

The Course

The primary ridge on the Cal Club property stretches across the south end, with the land gently cascading downward into a valley and then back up to the clubhouse. It is splendid topography for golf – varied but never severe. The contrast between the two nines adds yet another dimension to Cal’s variety. The outward half plays as a loop around the western side, and the inward half to the east has more of a back-and-forth feel. That description might lead one to believe that the front is more interesting, but the back has just as many advocates in the lively “which is better” debate. Strategic placement of hazards coupled with elevation changes tee to fairway to green gives the holes on the back nine an interesting character all their own. In the case of Cal Club’s routing, the whole is much greater than the sum of its parts.

The course always had splendid greens, which Kyle Phillips complemented beautifully with well-positioned bunkering unified in the MacKenzie-Hunter style. Conditions are kept fast and firm by Superintendent Javier Campos and his crew. They go to great lengths to provide the turf that delights players, including hand picking invasive poa from the bentgrass putting surfaces.

There are no weak holes at Cal, and no repetition within the sets of one, two and three-shotters. The changing wind and microclimates are factors that the savvy observe with keen senses to make adjustments. Smart aggressiveness is rewarded with birdie looks. The unconfident or foolhardy are afforded eighteen chances to wreck their card or blow a match.

Phillips and Campos give players a steady diet of picturesque shots on the ground, enhanced above by nature with the towering cypress trees and views of the surrounding San Bruno Mountains, Mount Diablo and Mount Tamalpais. Few inland courses offer more of a visual feast.

Click on any gallery image below to enlarge with captions

Cal’s opener is a gentle handshake par-5 playing up over a rise and then down to a green set at the north end of the property. The 1st is no pushover though, with hints of what’s to come—a deep bunker fronts the putting surface, which has ample slope. The par-4 2nd turns back and heads uphill to a fantastic green with bunkers right and a short grass run-off left. Coming through these two holes at level par is a solid start.

The third tee is the first real glimpse for players of the greatness of the land. This par-4 gently bends downhill and to the right around a set of difficult bunkers. The green backs up to the 8th, with a snaking bunker separating the two. The par-5 4th is understated from tee to green, but does demand consecutive solid shots to get in scoring position. Whatever thrills are lacking in the fairway are made up on the 4th green, featuring raised sides and a depproach into the next tee. The 5th is an outstanding strategic short four that plays uphill with staggered bunkers on both sides of the fairway. Pin position and comfortable approach distance are factors to be considered on the tee. This stretch of holes is getable, but it can just as easily get you.

Cal gets dramatic working across the ridge on the 6th and 7th. The green on the course’s first one-shotter is heavily pitched and elevated, with trouble on all sides and gorgeous Bay Area suburb views beyond. Deep bunkers guard the left, the property line and a fronting bunker are tight on the right, and long is a steep, tightly-mown runoff that is a potential funhouse of horrors. Players need to step up and hit a solid tee ball, or else. Phillips’s short par-4 7th is a fantastic hole that sweeps down and to the right in what some would consider a Cape style. After making a risk-reward decision off the tee, players can approach the receptive green through the air or on the ground.

The long par-3 8th plays downhill from the ridge to a green ringed by bunkers on three sides. Lower approaches have to contend with a fronting mound positioned in the spirit of rub-of-the-green to produce random bounces. The drive on the par-4 9th is blind back up the hill to a fairway that dances along a plateau around bunkers and a steep fall-off left. Players who miss the green can find all manner of challenge from sand to rough to contoured short grass.

The back nine begins with a stout two-shotter. The tee ball plays down into a valley and must be well struck to have a reasonable length approach into the well-protected green. The 11th turns back, plunging down and around a hillside left to a green set beautifully at the base of the hill on which the clubhouse sits. Shortgrass surrounds allow lovers of the ground game a chance to conjure a little magic. Players climb partway up the hill to cross the valley on the par-3 12th. The large green is fraught with peril, on and around the putting surface.

The next three holes play back and forth, but because of brilliant placement of hazards relative to tees and movement of the land, never feel monotonous. The interconnected fairways add a further touch of class. The par-4 13th is straightaway with bunkers flanking the landing zone. Approaches must be confident enough to crest the wicked false front. The par-4 14th snakes downhill to an angled green with bunkers cut into the hill below right. It is the tee shot on the three-shot 15th that plays with an angle to a fairway trudging uphill past a Principal’s Nose bunker. The partial amphitheater setting for the large, contoured green is breathtaking.

The closing stretch is ideal for match play, with each hole presenting the opportunity to make birdie while also holding open the real possibility of a double bogey. Cal’s final one-shotter is benched into a hillside in a manner reminiscent of the 12th at Augusta. The neighborhood beyond is visible—a reminder of the urban setting. The par-5 17th plays over a rise and then runs downhill to a reachable green. The home hole demands one more solid drive to an obscured landing area. The approach plays into a terrific tiered green with the clubhouse as a backdrop.

Over the years, many hands have touched the Cal Club. There is no doubt that today, both the club’s course and culture are in the very capable hands of people who get it, and who are willing to allow visitors to partake of the magic. Jamieson summed it up, “It is a place that people can come and have a great deal of fun and camaraderie…We try to treat a guest like a member.”

In the immediacy of the Cal Club experience, a feeling arises that was hinted at by Bob, Jerry, Phil and company:

California, preaching on the burning shore

California, I’ll be knocking on the golden door

Like and angel, standing in a shaft of light

Rising up to paradise, I know I’m gonna shine

And so too, that feeling of patiently waiting for one’s next taste:

My time coming, any day, don’t worry about me, no

It’s gonna be just like they say, them voices tell me so

Seems so long I’ve felt this way and time sure passin’ slow

My time coming, any day, don’t worry about me, no…

Copyright 2019 – Jason Way, GeekedOnGolf


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IN PRAISE OF RESTRAINT AT ROCK HOLLOW G.C.

The first edition of this season’s Upping My Dye-Q series takes a look at the Tim Liddy designed Rock Hollow Golf Club

“Who are you, and what do you do?” The direct inquiry by the local I encountered in the pro shop after completing an early-spring loop around the Tim Liddy designed Rock Hollow Golf Club caught me off guard. He must have noticed the befuddled look on my face, so he elaborated. “We saw you playing fast and carrying your bag. We know everyone who plays out here. What’s your story?” Gathering myself, I explained that I was on my way to French Lick and was taking the opportunity to see Rock Hollow, which had been on my hit list for years. After commiserating over our mutual affection for their home course, we settled in for the kind of enjoyable conversation that naturally flows among fellow geeks. Topics ranged from Chicago Golf Club to Langford & Moreau to the Pete Dye Course at French Lick, along with their beloved Rock Hollow. It was exactly the kind of community golf vibe that makes me feel right at home.

Pete’s Protege

Tim Liddy got his start at an engineering firm where he was working as a landscape architect and self-described “front end guy”. The engineers often assigned him to be the client liaison because of his skills with people and drawing. This dynamic led to an introduction to Pete Dye in 1990, resulting in his assignment to the Ocean Course project on Kiawah Island. “Pete didn’t draw plans. At that time, the permitting process required more detailed drawings,” Liddy shared. “Pete loved me because I had studied the world’s great golf holes and understood what he was talking about. It also helped that I drew well and quickly, and I didn’t mind that most of my drawings would end up in the garbage when he changed his mind. Pete started as my idol, served as my mentor, and ultimately became a father figure.” The pair’s collaboration carried on for 25 years with Pete concocting and Tim drawing.


Tim Liddy’s artistic talents on display in his digital watercolor of Rock Hollow’s 1st

Serendipity would continue to tap Tim Liddy in the early ‘90s. The Smith family, stalwarts of the game in Indiana, were looking to build a golf course and they approached Pete Dye through a mutual friend. While reviewing plans for another project at the dining room table in the Dye home, Pete made the simple suggestion, “Tim will do it.” The gears were set in motion for Liddy’s first solo design.

The Golfing Smiths

Why did the Smiths decide to build a golf course? “It’s 25 years later, and I am asking myself that same question,” joked Terry Smith, the patriarch of this golfing clan. Terry learned the game from his father, and passed it on to his three sons, Terry, Todd and Chris. All played high level competitive golf, with Chris ultimately becoming a PGA Tour winner.

The family owned a gravel and stone business that operated out of a 350+ acre quarry in Peru, IN. By 1972, the site had been mined out and sat fallow. “We left it alone to become wildlife habitat, but I felt that there could be a better use for the land,” Smith said. “Golf was such a big part of our lives, it made sense to transform the quarry into a golf course.” Clearing began in 1992, and based on Pete Dye’s recommendation, the Smith’s crew went to work under the direction of Liddy. “We had the equipment and people to handle the clearing and earthmoving, and Pete lent us a shaper to bring the finer details of Tim’s design to life.”

Creation stories tend to be romanticized, glossing over the gory details. Many golf geeks dream of building and owning their own course, and most have no comprehension of the blood, sweat and tears necessary to make that dream a reality. The story of Rock Hollow’s creation includes hints of just how tough it can be. “After unexpectedly having to top dress the entire course with soil from our farm, we found that the 7th hole was still too rocky to grow healthy turf,” recounted Smith. “Members of our family, staff and the community came out and crawled the entire length of the fairway on hands and knees picking out rocks prior to seeding.” With that level of commitment and engagement, it is no wonder that the Smiths and their neighbors remain attached to the course.

The Course

The site that would become Rock Hollow had two special characteristics on which Liddy capitalized. The mining operation created more than 50 feet of elevation change from the outer edges to the central lake—uncommon for this part of Indiana. Additionally, the site was much bigger than the golf course, allowing for the retention of that “nature preserve” feel. As Liddy described it, “Everything leads you into the natural landscape. It is like a watercolor with detail in the middle of the painting while the edges blur to support the whole.” Areas of wetland and woodland are interspersed, with the golf holes taking the player on an exploration of the land.

Rock Hollow’s nines are routed in two loops. Each begins by working around the property edge and then turning back inward to interact with the lake. The perimeter topography holds more interest, and Liddy took advantage of that variety to create a collection of holes packed with character. “One of the best things about Tim’s design is that there are no weak holes,” gushed Smith. Even after discounting his owner’s bias, I tend to agree that Rock Hollow is solid from start to finish. A unique and creative hole like the short par-4 16th, with its semi-blind approach to a green that seemingly floats on the horizon, stands out from the rest as a favorite.

Click on any gallery image below to enlarge with captions

In typical Dye fashion, Liddy employed angles, elevation changes and landforms to make the player feel uncomfortable on the tee. Confident drives are rewarded, but the best line to take is frequently not evident to the newbie visitor. Unlike some of Pete Dye’s courses, Rock Hollow has a much more understated aesthetic to accompany the strategy. “The design was a reaction to Pete’s strong personality,” Liddy explained. “The feature shapes are simple and the edges are blurry on purpose, allowing the landscape to be the focus.” This conscious restraint does not result in a bland golf course, however. To complement the natural beauty of the setting, Liddy took a hands-on approach that is evident in varied green surrounds and large, contoured putting surfaces. Rock Hollow is a course that would remain interesting, challenging and fun even after numerous plays.

Returning to the locals in the pro shop, their pride in Rock Hollow is palpable and well founded. After a period during which the conditions deteriorated, new Superintendent Larry Wilk and his team have the course looking and playing great. The design might be restrained, but the hard work and love that have gone into making Rock Hollow a terrific community golf course have been anything but. “I love golf, and it feels good to have created a place for our family to work and play the game,” Smith mused. “We took an unproductive piece of land and gave it a new use that makes people happy.” Terry Smith doesn’t say so explicitly, but I get the sense that reflecting on the joy that his course has brought to players makes the investment of blood, sweat and tears worth it.

For those in search of fun, affordable and architecturally interesting golf, Rock Hollow should be on your list. The Smith family is ready to welcome you in Peru.


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GEEKED ON GOLF GLOBAL GUIDE

The ever-expanding resource for researching golf courses, including articles, photo tours, podcasts and video playlists.

“I’m heading to _________ and I want to play. Any suggestions?”

Forms of this inquiry arrive via phone, text and email on a regular basis. Given the seemingly endless sea of information about golf courses, some from sources more credible than others, it doesn’t surprise me that my buddies like to use me as a filter. After all, they know that course research is one of many things that I love about the game. So why waste their time doing legwork that I have probably already done?

Truth be told, even if I don’t have an immediate answer, I will often put forth the effort to find one. It would pain my geeky heart to learn that a friend had overpaid for lame golf while I remained silent. Such tragedies should be avoided at all costs.

In the digital age, commentary, photos and videos have proliferated to the point that I was in need of a new tool to keep the best of it organized. Thus, the GeekedOnGolf Global Guide was born.

This interactive map has more than 1,000 pinned courses around the world for which I have found digital content. Each pin contains links to that content. A tip on using the map: in order for the hyperlinks in the pin notes to remain active, the map must be viewed in a browser (as opposed to viewing in the Google Maps app on your phone or tablet). Browser viewing can be done through the embed on this page, or by clicking here.

This new tool allows me to continuously add and update new articles, photo tours, podcasts and videos. There are sources for course information that I consistently follow, and links are labeled with SOURCE-AUTHOR codes. A legend for those sources in below. Further, on my YouTube Channel, course video playlists are being added and updated regularly. Links to those playlists are provided in the map pins and labeled YT.

Much golfing ground has already been covered, and I will carry on with the evolution of this resource. I hope that it is useful to you. Feel free to shoot me links and leads to add to the Guide. Just like golf, learning more about courses is much more fun with buddies.


Global Guide Legend

GoG: Geeked On Golf

YT: YouTube playlists – Particularly keen on the video content coming out from Erik Anders Lang, No Laying Up, The Fried Egg and other new school media.

TFE: The Fried Egg – The written, audio and video content that Andy and his crew are putting out is educational and entertaining.

GCA: Golf Club Atlas – Ran is the architecture geeks’ OG, and his community continues to produce enlightening content.

GL: Graylyn Loomis – Graylyn lived in Scotland and is now back in the U.S. writing for Links.

GT: Golf Tripper – Of the list chasers, I find Steve’s content to be the most resonant.

LM: Links Magazine – The Links crew has consistently been putting out good course content for a long time.

PG: Planet Golf – Darius is an insanely well traveled guy, giving his perspective particular weight for me.

GCAM: Golf Course Architecture Magazine – Adam and his contributors keep up on industry news, while also putting out great course related articles.

GCG: Golf Course Gurus – Billy is also very well traveled, especially in the Western U.S. His profiles contain robust photo collections.

CM: Caddie Magazine – This crew from down under has great style.

GA: Golf Advisor – With Brad and Matt leading the way, there has been an uptick in the content quality coming out of GA.

FTB: Feed The Ball – Derek is experienced and thoughtful, and his podcast is great listening for architecture geeks.

GAM: Golf Australia Magazine – The Aussie’s love their golf, and their coverage of courses is excellent.

DR: Dimpled Rock Photography – Gary takes beautiful photos of beautiful courses, mostly in the U.S.

GLP: Gary Lisbon Photography – Ditto on the beauty, but with a focus on Australasia and the U.K.

Coming soon…

More articles from writers I enjoy, like Geoff Shackelford, Ron Whitten, Anthony Pioppi, Tony Dear and Thomas Dunne. More photo albums from Evan Schiller, Brian Oar and my other favorites. The incredibly robust Joe Bausch course tour collection. More videos and podcasts. On and on it goes…

Please support the content creators by following their work and respecting their intellectual property.

Enjoy!

Copyright 2019 – Jason Way, GeekedOnGolf


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TIMELESS IDEALS AT NATIONAL GOLF LINKS

An in-depth profile of C.B. Macdonald’s National Golf Links of America and the design ideals it embodies.

The National. Two words that, especially for devotees of classic architecture, hold so much meaning. These words are not just shorthand for the club named National Golf Links of America, they carry the weight of one man’s incredibly lofty aspiration. An aspiration that history has proven to have been fulfilled.

Charles Blair Macdonald set out to create the ideal links on Long Island after having spent years studying the great golf holes of the British Isles to ascertain what specifically made them great. With assistance from H.J. Whigham, Devereux Emmet, and most notably Seth Raynor, he then poured all of that greatness into one eighteen hole loop that opened for play in 1909.

Not long after its opening, Bernard Darwin summed up the feeling the course has evoked from so many subsequent visitors:

“How good a course it is, I hardly dare trust myself to say on a short acquaintance; there is too much to learn about it and the temptation to frantic enthusiasm is so great, but this much I can say: Those who think that it is the greatest golf course in the world may be right or wrong, but are certainly not to be accused of any intemperateness of judgment.”

Perhaps Darwin was unwilling to pronounce the course the greatest back then, but at this point time, he would likely agree with the assertion that the greatness of the National is timeless. The combination of strategic design, beauty and fun transcend the fads of any particular era. I tapped Jon Cavalier (@LinksGems) and Simon Haines (@Hainesy76) for this collaboration – the historical perspective of Macdonald and his contemporaries is complemented by Jon’s terrific photos, which make abundantly clear how beautifully the course is currently presented by Superintendent Bill Salinetti and his team.

After a tour through all eighteen holes, I am confident that this contrast of past and present will prove the case that Charles Blair Macdonald’s ingenious approach to designing and building The National ensured that it would stand the test of time.

The Course

“Any golfer conversant with the golf courses abroad and the best we have in America – which are generally conceded to be Garden City, Myopia and the Chicago Golf Club – knows that in America as yet we have no first-class golf course comparable with the classic golf courses in Great Britain and Ireland. There is no reason why this should be so, and it is the object of this association to build such a course, making it as near National as possible, and further, with the object of promoting the best interests of the game of golf in the United States. With this end in view, it is proposed to buy two hundred or more acres of ground on Long Island, where the soil is best suited for the purpose of laying out a golf course…As to the building of the golf course, it is well known that certain holes on certain links abroad are famous as being the best considering their various lengths. It is the object of this association to model each of the eighteen holes after the most famous holes abroad, so that each hole would be representative and classic in itself.” – C.B. Macdonald, from the Founders Agreement

Imagine a band holding a press conference at which they announce that they are headed into the studio to record their next album. They have studied the greatest songs in the history of music and have settled on the best tracks. They are not simply going to do an album of covers though. They have distilled the essence of greatness from each song and will create new songs that not only embody the essence of the originals, but also work together as a cohesive album. The cohesiveness is born of the adaptation of the songs to suit the current musical landscape while simultaneously harmonizing with each other. If the media and fans were even able to grasp such a plan, they would not likely believe that it would be possible to pull off. Essentially, that was exactly what C.B. Macdonald told prospective Founding Members of National Golf Links of America he would do, and then he delivered.

Click on any gallery image below to enlarge with captions


Drawing inspiration from his beloved links, Macdonald routed NGLA in a traditional out and back fashion. He found and used the best features of the land to deliver both beauty and variety. That variety is reflected in the sequence of holes – distance, direction, difficulty…consecutive holes are never repetitive. There is interest throughout the entire routing, but there is also a palpable slow build. It starts on the first tee with views of the 18th green, Peconic Bay, the clubhouse and the windmill. Players are then taken on a thrill ride over the Sahara and Alps hills with views of Bulls Head Bay, naturally drawing their attention to the all-world Redan 4th. The course then runs out on gentler land across the road, to the turn and back across the road. The first glimpse of the windmill on the hill comes on the 11th green, signaling the start of the adventure home. That iconic landmark grows bigger with every hole completed until players reach the cripplingly gorgeous home stretch, with the Eden and Cape hard against Bulls Head, the trek up and over the 16th fairway to the Punchbowl, and then the view from the 17th tee, which is as pretty as any in golf. Finally and sadly, the climb from the gates up the 18th fairway, with the Jarvis Hunt clubhouse on the left and the wide expanse of Peconic Bay to the right, the breeze coming in off the water and if timed just right, the sun going down behind the sand. It is no wonder that a routing so clearly designed to conjure magic bewitches those fortunate enough to make the journey.

Course map of NGLA – Credit: Keith Cutten

HOLE #1 “Valley” – 326 yards – par 4


From the first tee with the Jarvis Hunt clubhouse left of the fairway

This beautiful little opener gives the player an idea of what he will confront constantly during his round – choices. Playing left to right, the choice of tee shot could be anything from a mid-iron to driver. Overly timid or indifferent tee shots will catch a string of bunkers laid out short of the fairway. The carry to the left is significantly farther than it appears from the tee. While the aggressive line makes the green reachable for longer players, these bunkers will extract a severe price from an overly ambitious tee-shot hit by an overly confident player. The green is elevated, obscuring parts of the putting surface and surrounding area from view on the approach. A severe false front will repel shots that come up short. Balls missed left will find deep bunkers, while those right will encounter a series of random humps and mounds. The first green is rife with undulations and ridges, placing added importance on an accurate approach. Simply put, this is one of the best openers in golf.

HOLE #2 “Sahara” – 302 yards – par 4


From the tee on the 2nd, with the imposing sandy waste, and pre-windmill water tower

“The short player who cannot carry even 150 yards must avoid the bunker altogether by aiming to the right. He has a perfectly open fair green there, but he cannot reach the brow of the hill and he is left with a blind and extremely difficult second. The principle of the hole is to give the player on the tee a great number of alternatives according to his strength and courage. If he plays for the green and succeeds he has the advantage of at least one stroke over the opponent who takes the shorter carry to the right, and probably more than one stroke over the player who avoids the carry altogether. But if he fails, he may easily take a five or six and lose to the short player who goes around. The Sahara at the National is a better hole than the Sahara at Sandwich, first because the edge of the main bunker is more clearly defined, and secondly because the second shot for the player who makes for safety is far more difficult…At the National the second shot is always difficult unless the big carry is made; in fact, a fairly good tee-shot played only a little to the right is apt to run down to the bottom of the hollow, and result in too difficult a second…In the main the National Sahara is one of the most inspiring holes in golf; the carry is stupendous and awe-inspiring, and there is great reward for the perfect shot; but there are plenty of alternatives, and for those who cannot go for the flag there are infinite possibilities in the approach. Fifteen years ago a 270-yard hole was considered a very poot affair; with the rubber-cored ball and natural features like those of the Sahara properly taken advantage of it is perhaps the finest hole in golf.” – C.B. Macdonald and H.J. Whigham, Golf Illustrated, 1914

HOLE #3 “Alps” – 473 yards – par 4


The Alps green, with its tricky internal contours

“A long tee-shot played directly on the flag or anywhere to the left of the flag leaves the ball at the foot of the large hill called the Alps, and then the second shot is extremely difficult; for the ball must be raised abruptly and must still have a very long flight. The best line is to the right where the hill slopes down to the level and where the ball will get a longer roll and the second shot is much easier. But to get to the right the long carry must be taken off the tee, and when the tee is back the extreme carry is nearly 190 yards. Therefore, although the Prestwick tee-shot has to be placed rather more exactly, the National tee-shot is more spectacular. And at the National the second is more difficult on account of the extra length and the higher position of the green. In other words, the third hole at the National is an improved Alps, and as a test of golf it is beyond reproach. It is impossible to reach the green in two unless the tee-shot and the second are real big golfing strokes, hit in the middle of the club, and that can be said of very few holes with a maximum distance of only 413 yards.” – C.B. Macdonald and H.J. Whigham, Golf Illustrated, 1914

HOLE #4 “Redan” – 194 yards – par 3


A crowd watches a match on the Redan green

“Take a narrow tableland, tilt it a little from right to left, dig a deep bunker on the front side, approach it diagonally, and you have the Redan…The principle of the Redan can be used wherever a long narrow tableland can be found or made. Curiously enough the Redan existed at the National long before the links was thought of. It is a perfectly natural hole. The essential part, the tilted tableland was almost exactly like the North Berwick original. All that had to be done was to dig the bunker in the face, and place the tee properly. The National Redan is rather more difficult than the North Berwick hole, because the bunker at the back of the green is much deeper and more severe. Some people think the hole is too difficult altogether. But anyone who gets a legitimate three there, especially in a medal round, is sure to say that it is the finest short hole in the world. There is no compromise about it. Whichever of the various methods of attack is chosen, the stroke must be bold, cleanly hit and deadly accurate. At the ordinary hole of 180 yards it is a very bad shot that does not stay on the green. At the Redan it takes an exceedingly good shot to stay anywhere on the green; and to get a putt for a two is something to brag about for a week…In reality there are only about four or five kinds of good holes in golf. The local scenery supplies the variety. Here is one of the four or five perfect kinds. The principle of the Redan cannot be improved upon for a hole of 180 yards.” – C.B. Macdonald and H.J. Whigham, Golf Illustrated, 1914

HOLE #5 “Hog’s Back” – 474 yards – par 4

The third of three difficult holes, the 5th at National asks for a tee shot over a formidable cross bunker cut into the hill to a fairway humped down its spine so as to shed balls to either side. The fairway’s natural ripples provide added visual and playing interest. Longer drives will contend with a unique trench bunker that bisects the fairway. The wide, downsloping fairway leads straight into the green and will carry running approach shots a long way, allowing even shorter hitters to reach this long par-4 in two shots. Two bunkers left of the green strongly suggest that the player use the sloping right-to-left fairway to access the green.

HOLE #6 “Short” – 123 yards – par 3


The original Short 6th, with Royal West Norfolk inspired sleepers fronting the green

The diminutive sixth might be the shortest hole at National, but with one of the largest and wildest greens on the property, it is as fun as it is maddening. From the tee, the greens for Sebonac and Eden are visible to the right. To say this putting surface on this Short template is heavily contoured is to understate the matter substantially. The large mound in the center sheds balls in all directions, as does the larger green itself. Any ball that fails to find (or hold) the green is likely to end up in a bunker – some more penal than others.

HOLE #7 “St. Andrews” – 505 yards – par 5

The first three shot hole at National is Macdonald’s tribute to the Road Hole at St. Andrews. A blind tee shot over a waste area is the first order of business. The bunkering down the right, which is largely invisible from the tee, will catch any shots that stray that way. The National is replete with interesting and unique terrain features, like the slash of a bunker and fronting mound. Two small bunkers in the area short of the green are so flat that they are invisible from a distance, adding to the uncertainty and challenge of the approach. The road bunker looms to the left of the elevated and large green, adding exponentially to the difficulty of judging and hitting an approach shot. A brilliant feature. The most formidable Road Hole bunker that Macdonald ever created, this monster has allegedly been softened over time. The green, while largely flat, slopes away on all sides and is harder to hold than it appears. A large, deep bunker runs down the entire right side of the green, ready to catch those who decline to challenge the Road bunker. An exceptional three-shot hole in every respect.

HOLE #8 “Bottle” – 407 yards – par 4

“A few such bunkers are excellent, diagonal or en echelon. Variety is what one wants in a hole properly laid out. Long carries should not be compulsory, but if taken, the player should have a distinct advantage. Where there are bunkers at varying distances from the tee, the player has the option of going around or over according to his judgment. Bear in mind that a course must be absorbing and interesting, and not built for crack players only.” – C.B. Macdonald, Scotland’s Gift: Golf

Another template that has been largely lost with time, Macdonald’s “Bottle” hole presents the options while playing over Shrubland Road. Take the straightforward tee shot down the right side, or attack the left side of the fairway and challenge the bunkers in return for a better view and angle into the green. The Bottle bunkers that bisect the 8th are unique in design and formidable in their defense of the hole and they play bigger than they look. Between the Bottle bunkers and the green, Macdonald installed a Principal’s Nose bunker complex. The green is substantially elevated with steep drops on three sides, and missing right is particularly penal.

HOLE #9 “Long” – 534 yards – par 5

The aptly named ninth is the longest hole at the National, which is perhaps surprising to some, since it measures only 540 yards. But what this hole lacks in length, it more than makes up for in other ways. The ideal line off the tee is to remain as far right as possible while still carrying the short set of bunkers. Shots hit down the left will run through the fairway and feed into the “Hell’s Half Acre” complex. Once past Hell’s Half Acre, a large green defended by steep bunkers short left and long right awaits. Certain pins will force the player to challenge the right bunkers and the side slope of the green, which will shed balls up to 25 yards away.

HOLE #10 “Shinnecock” – 445 yards – par 4

The 10th at National, drawing its name from its neighbor, borders Shinnecock Hills and turns the player back northward toward the clubhouse. It is a hole that ranks as a favorite among many. Two low profile cross bunkers encroaching into the fairway from either side add challenge to the tee shot. What looks like a rather straightforward approach shot from the safer, right side of the fairway is soon revealed to be more challenging than it first appears. Again, Macdonald maps the terrain to allow approaches to the green along safer, if at times less rewarding routes.  Here, if the proper angles are played, no hazards need be crossed. Shinnecock is punctuated by a wonderful green complex, to be sure.

HOLE #11 “Plateau” – 430 yards – par 4

A blind tee shot awaits the golfer at the eleventh hole, and care should be taken to avoid the left side as gathering bunkers collect shots hit in this area. The approach on eleven crosses back over the road, obscured here by a berm. A second Principal’s Nose bunker complex sits short of the green. Macdonald’s exceptional Double Plateau green speaks for itself, with bold front left and back right sections set at an angle and divided by a deep trough. The small bunkers arrayed around this green have a much larger footprint than their actual size. It’s very possible to putt into some of them. The large bunker behind guards the lower portion of the green and will catch balls that skirt through the middle of the plateaus.

HOLE #12 “Sebonac” – 459 yards – par 4

This two-shotter calls for a tee shot to an ample but angled fairway guarded by deep bunkers down the left side. Approach shots confront a small, slightly elevated green fraught with hazards on all sides. The lack of any background makes gauging distance difficult to a green that runs hard away to the right and rear.

HOLE #13 “Eden” – 166 yards – par 3

The third of the National’s three one-shot holes, Macdonald’s homage to the original at The Old Course at St. Andrews is fronted by the famous pond, which prevents players from having a go at the green with a putter. The result is a gorgeous hole. The Hill, Strath and Shelley bunkers are all present and accounted for, as is the namesake Eden bunker wrapping behind the green, which is particularly menacing. Tucked into a corner of the property, the Eden green is one of the most peaceful and beautiful spots in golf.

HOLE #14 “Cape” – 391 yards – par 4


The nerve-racking tee shot on the Cape 14th

“The fourteenth hole at the National Golf Links is called the Cape Hole, because the green extends out into the sea with which it is surrounded upon three sides. It is today one of the most individual holes in existence and there is probably not another one like it anywhere. In a straight line to the green over the water the distance is 296 yards. The direction of play however is to the left, over a neck of the sea and then over a sharp face of rising ground. The shortest way over the water, a carry of 120 yards, is the longest way to the hole, whereas the shortest way to the hole is to the right, a carry of 150 yards. This carry, may not in yards appear very formidable, but the sea hugging closely to the right of the fairgreen, extends such a compelling invitation to a slice, that as a moral hazard it has proven very disastrous to the golfer. One who has been accustomed to the ordinary hazard placed to penalize a slice can have no conception of the effect which this limitless expanse of water has; and especially so because it stands mercilessly guarding the straightest line to the hole. The ordinary echelon bunker asks no more that to be carried, but here, not only a good carry is demanded, but the most precise direction. The temptation to risk it is very great, for the line to the middle of the fairgreen at a distance of 210 yards, is but a shade to the left of this longest carry, and as at this point the fairgreen is but forty-seven yards in width, with a series of four large sand traps to catch a pull, the risk is mandatory upon the long driver. If the shot is successful, the player is left with a niblick pitch over a pebbly beach onto a flat green which from his position is one hundred feet in width. An over approach is disastrous, consequently, a far four to this hole, which by land is but a little over 300 yards, is very satisfying.” – C.B. Macdonald and H.J. Whigham, Golf Illustrated, 1914

HOLE #15 “Narrows” – 419 yards – par 4

“Composite first shot of the 14th or Perfection at North Berwick, with green and bunker guards like the 15th at Muirfield.” – C.B. Macdonald in Outing, 1906

Perhaps the most beautiful hole at National, the fifteenth plays out to a fairway flanked with bunkers on all sides. Missing the fairway into the left bunkers cut into the hillside all but guarantees a missed green. Macdonald’s strategic bunkering including one in the middle of the fairway some 60 yards short of the green, which is offset slightly to the left and is well guarded. This is the most heavily bunkered hole at National. The green slopes substantially from back to front, aiding with approaches but making putting difficult. Long is a brutal miss here, as the player must not only confront the deep bunker, but the slope of the green running away. Once again, Macdonald gave the player no close background for reference, and the horizon look only adds to the challenge.

HOLE #16 “Punchbowl” – 476 yards – par 4


A gallery follows a match up the fairway on the 16th

An Alps/Punchbowl – this surely must be heaven. The 16th hole begins with a tee shot up a rising fairway, ideally reaching the level portion of the ground beyond the first crest. Straying too far to the right, however, will lead a ball to a deep hollow, similar to the feature on the second hole.  While all shots into the sixteenth green are blind and uphill, an approach from the bottom of the hollow is doubly so. It also shares a Sahara-like bunker feature with the second hole, visible from short of the green. The putting surface itself is tiny, although the surrounding punchbowl features contain shots that miss. Having cleared the fronting bunkers, the player must still contend with the ridge running from the back of the hazard to the front of the green, which will deflect balls in random directions. Two bunkers set high into the face of the left hill provide a formidable hazard for shots that are far enough offline to deserve such a fate. An incomparable hole.

HOLE #17 “Peconic” – 370 yards – par 4


From the tee, the rugged Leven 17th rolling downhill

“The view over Peconic Bay is one of the loveliest in the world.” – Bernard Darwin

Indeed. The penultimate hole at NGLA is a gorgeous in every respect, but it is also a world class short par-4 Leven template. From the tee, the player is forced to lay up short of the two fairway bunkers or drive over them to the left. This hole is reachable for longer hitters. On approach from the right, the player confronts an odd sandy berm that runs the length of the green and hides parts of the putting surface. The berm also hides the small pot bunkers, which stand ready to catch any shot left short. This defense is a unique feature, and one that can’t be found elsewhere.

HOLE #18 “Home” – 501 yards – par 5

“Finally there is, I think, the finest eighteenth hole in all the world.” – Bernard Darwin

Playing far longer than its listed yardage, the three shot eighteenth hole plays back up to the clubhouse with full views of Peconic Bay. While headed up the home fairway, one appreciates what Bernard Darwin meant when he wrote of the beauty of golf along Peconic Bay. In approaching the green, the left side affords the better view, the right the better angle of play. The green provides ample room for a ground approach but falls away rather steeply on all sides – long does not work well here. Cresting the hill and putting out, the first time player senses that the game will never be quite the same for them again.

“There are no more beautiful golfing vistas in all the world than those from the National Golf Club.” – C.B. Macdonald

Charles Blair Macdonald had panache, but he was also a man of purpose. These two sides of his personality are reflected in the design of National Golf Links. Looking at the aerial and ground photographs, one can’t help but notice that there is quite a bit going on. The experience of playing the course is similar. So much to see and take in. The wealth of artistic features should not be mistaken for mindless clutter though. Every mound and bunker has a purpose, every contour a use. Taken together, these features combine to form holes that have asked players complex questions for more than a century. The answers do not come easily. Repeat play and careful study are required of those whose aim is to discover all of NGLA’s secrets.

Macdonald was not an architect for hire at National Golf Links. This was his club. He was deeply invested in its success financially, intellectually and emotionally. He was not just building the next in a long line of golf courses. He was creating a masterwork. That devotion showed in the product of his work in Darwin’s day, and its timelessness endures.

For those wishing to dive even deeper into the history of the club, more knowledgeable men have already covered that ground. I cannot recommend highly enough George Bahto’s The Evangelist of Golf: The Story of Charles Blair Macdonald, Chris Millard’s NGLA club history book, and Macdonald’s own Scotland’s Gift: Golf.

Copyright 2019 – Jason Way, GeekedOnGolf


3 Comments

GCA Video Archive – The Commentators

This section of the archive is dedicated to commentary on golf courses and golf course architecture.  It contains link compilations to Golf Channel’s special weeks, as well as videos from individual commentators that are typically not course specific.  This is also the section where I have placed miscellanea that did not fit in any other category.

GinellaShackelford.png


DECEMBER 2013 – GOLF CHANNEL ARCHITECTS WEEK

FEBRUARY 2015 – GOLF CHANNEL ARCHITECTS WEEK II

DECEMBER 2015 – GOLF CHANNEL ARCHITECTURE WEEK III

NOVEMBER 2015 –  GOLF CHANNEL WATER WEEK

DECEMBER 2017 – GOLF CHANNEL DESIGN WEEK


MATT GINELLA

Other Golf Channel appearances:

GEOFF SHACKELFORD

Other Golf Channel appearances:

RON WHITTEN

BRADLEY KLEIN

ROBERT S. MACDONALD

KYLE TRUAX – GOLF TRUAXIOMS

 

WORLD GOLF HALL OF FAME

PHILADELPHIA GOLFCLUBATLAS GATHERINGS

Videos courtesy of Joe Bausch and Matt Frey

COB CARLSON – DONALD ROSS, DISCOVERING THE LEGEND

MISCELLANEOUS 

SCOREGOLF

100 YEARS OF THE MET OPEN

IVIEW 2D GOLF COURSE TOURS


MORE GCA VIDEO ARCHIVES:

 

 

Copyright 2017 – Jason Way, GeekedOnGolf


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GCA Video Archive – The Courses of Australia & Asia

This section is dedicated to the golf courses of Australia and Asia.  Videos include course tours, aerials, feature stories and more.  The courses are organized alphabetically by country and course name.  This section is constantly evolving and being updated.  I hope that you find it to be a good way to do research, and relive happy memories.


AUSTRALIA

Barnbougle Dunes

9/19/10 – Wandering Golfer – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qK6wamAiFrs

4/30/13 – The Golf Show – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CWOVQGMHTXE

3/31/15 – Holden Golf World – https://youtu.be/t5W7A9_ybS8

Barnbougle Lost Farm

9/21/11 – History and construction – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B15oDTbULGE

4/7/12 – Construction photo tour from Keith Rhebb – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=axvoDCAjUyU

11/11/15 – Holden Golf World – https://youtu.be/uVczxxNyCTY

Bonnie Doon Golf Club

11/7/11 – GCA Forum Pt.1 – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zkH0myFUP0E

11/7/11 – GCA Forum Pt.2 – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2MjZvWL7NWw

2/27/14 – Stage 2 Overview – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KrBS1V0mpuw

4/5/12 – Bunker Shaping – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i1lmkcA4ez0

8/14/13 – #9 Before and After – http://occmgolf.com/bonnie-doon-before-and-after-hole-9/

5/2/14 – Stage 2 Complete – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S4FPwun6s5o

Cape Wickham Links – King Island

4/23/15 – PerryGolf & Travel: course profile – https://youtu.be/px_PMk4d1us

3/23/16 – Official Course Video – https://youtu.be/A6-zD3Nz6WQ

1/10/17 – Fox Sports Australia hosts play the course 7:47 mark – https://youtu.be/paoNITYrPzY

Commonwealth Golf Club

5/10/15 – Holden Golf World – https://youtu.be/A3UZzYbaz1I

2/5/15 – Mike Cocking re: renovations – http://vimeo.com/118803221

Kingston Heath Golf Club

10/13/13 – Golf Getaway – https://youtu.be/T3Iy0lx0f7Q

September/November 2016 – World Cup of Golf hole profiles by Richard Macafee:

2nd          3rd          9th          11th          15th          16th

1/8/17 – Drone footage from AirSwing Media – https://vimeo.com/198310703

The Lakes GC

3/7/13 – GolfTVAustralia course tour – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EdWr8lAxr3Y

Lake Karrinyup CC

2/13/17 – Pros discuss the course from The Golf Channel – http://bit.ly/2m8BmO8

Metropolitan Golf Club

9/15/14 – Holden Golf World – https://youtu.be/u8xsHJCTX2s

The National GC

8/26/14 – Holden Golf World – https://youtu.be/FjPxxeFjdh0

New South Wales GC

11/11/15 – Holden Golf World – https://youtu.be/QM9TMTMdIeY

Ocean Dunes – King Island

1/10/17 – Fox Sports Australia hosts play the course – https://youtu.be/paoNITYrPzY

Peninsula Kingswood CGC

7/27/15 – OCCM re: South Course hole #10 – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ObHoJj5GObo

NEW – 2/2/17 – OCCM re: North Course renovation drone footage and commentary from Mike Cocking – https://youtu.be/04cCnC_N4QU

Royal Canberra GC

12/20/16 – Club redesign overhead video from OCCM – https://youtu.be/jLVHlrDPmKY

Royal Melbourne

11/14/11 – PGA Tour preview – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=281SjYO5WnI

11/30/11 – Presidents Cup hole previews:

11/21/13 – GolfGetaway: RM West Course – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qvHnojHHG7A

11/17/13 – Golf Getaway: RM East Course – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WVHC1CO7XiI

12/12/13 – Course tour from Scott Michaux – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vN379cqmoM0

9/10/14 – Aerials from Eagle I – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kIki7SZKQ0M

CHINA

Coming soon…

JAPAN

Coming soon…

NEW ZEALAND

Cape Kidnappers GC

11/28/13 – Holden Golf World – https://youtu.be/8Aq447b9vO8

4/6/14 – Golf Getaway Part I – https://youtu.be/x-rG6Ka3jsk

4/13-14 – Golf Getaway Part II – https://youtu.be/yiqKDOWfsSc

Kinloch Club

3/23/14 – GolfGetaway – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1PcfGFDa5hI

Kuari Cliffs GC

11/28/13 – Holden Golf World – https://youtu.be/XxUHen3-qXA

3/2/14 – Golf Getaway Part I – https://youtu.be/1jetiDBe0OQ

3/9/14 – Golf Getaway Part II – https://youtu.be/GYOfdatHFIY

Paraparaumu Beach Golf Club

4/22/14 – Holden Golf World – https://youtu.be/biGlHmFRR0o

Tara Iti Golf Club

9/3/15 – Photo compilation from JGrundfos – https://youtu.be/dupsz6Yh7OY

3/4/16 – Par 4 4th from the Traveling Golfer – https://youtu.be/RhtqpGhWFOU

3/4/16 – Par 4 14th from the Traveling Golfer – https://youtu.be/MSeaeldPMHY

3/4/16 – Par 3 17th from The Traveling Golfer – https://youtu.be/-JIfeyjjQic

3/4/16 – Par 5 18th from the Traveling Golfer – https://youtu.be/l4SrzFAJWIw

Titirangi Golf Club

5/17/15 – Holden Golf World – https://youtu.be/4ktdRem9Xes

UNITED ARAB EMIRATES

Trump International Golf Club Dubai

2/10/14 – Gil Hanse interview profiles the course – https://youtu.be/HAzax1Teub0


MORE GCA VIDEO ARCHIVES:

 

 

Copyright 2017 – Jason Way, GeekedOnGolf


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GCA Video Archive – The Courses of Europe

This section is dedicated to the golf courses of Europe.  Videos include course tours, aerials, feature stories and more.  Open Rota courses are presented first, and then the rest are organized alphabetically by country and course name.  This section is constantly evolving and being updated.  I hope that you find it to be a good way to do research, and relive happy memories.


OPEN CHAMPIONSHIP ROTA VENUES

RoyalBirkdaleLogo.pngRoyal Birkdale GC

(Host: 2017, 2008, 1998, 1991, 1983, 1976, 1971, 1965, 1961, 1954)

RoyalTroonLogo.pngRoyal Troon GC

(Host: 2016, 2004, 1997, 1989, 1982, 1973, 1962, 1950, 1923)

HOLE #1 – Par 4                    HOLE #11 – Par 4

HOLE #2 – Par 4                   HOLE #14 – Par 3 

HOLE #3 – Par 4                   HOLE #15 – Par 4

HOLE #4 – Par 5                   HOLE #16 – Par 5

HOLE #8 – Par 3                   HOLE #17 – Par 3

HOLE #9 – Par 4                   HOLE #18 – Par 4

HOLE #10 – Par 4


GREAT BRITAIN & IRELAND 

SCOTLAND

Askernish GC

11/4/14 – Golfing World – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ujHnx91pzow

Castle Stuart

2009 – Ethos Documentary – http://www.castlestuartgolf.com/ethos.php

11/6/16 – Golfing World – https://youtu.be/-JAENt4s7UY

Kingsbarns Golf Links

1/8/16 – Insight and overview from PerryGolf & Travel – https://youtu.be/R5Scdu4vpFA

Gullane GC

5/18/15 – Course flyover and commentary – https://youtu.be/tt-C3E2oIM8

1/31/17 – Course vlog from Scottish Golf Podcast – https://youtu.be/tI2a6f-rjjM

Machrihanish Dunes

6/25/11 – The Way Golf Began with David McLay Kidd – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Im6s58SnFlw

Nairn GC

2/27/14 – Golfing World – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=thsB51cmHuE

1/5/16 – Insight and overview from PerryGolf & Travel – https://youtu.be/Nmvk8cIl3w8

North Berwick GC

11/9/14 – Teeuplo TV – https://youtu.be/HEprEE2TJQE

1/27/17 – Course vlog from Scottish Golf Podcast – https://youtu.be/YAeoUiH-o7E

Prestwick GC

5/6/08 – Hidden Links Golf Tours – https://youtu.be/CDIxul7rHQw

1/6/16 – Insight and overview from PerryGolf & Travel – https://youtu.be/_Edor4qFkI8

Royal Aberdeen GC

1/18/16 – Insight and overview from PerryGolf & Travel – https://youtu.be/lsCN_Y2j-Nk

Royal Dornoch GC

11/15/10 – Course profile from Scotland Golf Courses – https://youtu.be/cknbfqS6e-4

9/29/15 – Golfing World – https://youtu.be/WgNVh6jYj7A

“Celebrating 400 Years of Golf,” from CNN Living Golf – http://cnn.it/2haQNTH

St. Andrews Golf Links

Castle Course:

2/28/11 – GolfBug TV – https://youtu.be/cYxCGtFwa-0

2/5/15 – Overview – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BeZh9LzZ598

The Old Course:

4/16/15 – Golfing World: Prep for The Open – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u58OA_ib0jo6/6/15

6/6/15 – Virtual flyover intro – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RArZeoLXbo4

7/14/15 – Bird’s-eye view from Golf.com – https://youtu.be/DwwvDmS13gk

July 2015 – Hole flyovers

Trump Turnberry – Ailsa Course

4/21/15 – Proposed changes – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rPRQjC5pY2g

5/23/16 – What to expect from recent changes from Scottish Golf Podcast – https://youtu.be/Ua1SGTrVYBc

12/8/16 – Renovations overview from The Travelling Golfer – https://youtu.be/wVJfPOOnfU0

ENGLAND

Copt Heath GC

5/22/15 – Golfing World – https://youtu.be/aA-VTcfvRVo

Liphook GC

9/27/16 – Course overview from MB Golf Marketing – https://youtu.be/IEqZFIN7U44

9/27/16 – Six hole tour from MB Golf Marketing – https://youtu.be/hkvo2uatFxI

Royal Lytham & St. Annes

9/16/15 – Golfing World – https://youtu.be/ovJMbGc3WXI

Royal Liverpool

3/12/14 – Golfing World – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5K92PQyq_WQ

Royal St. George’s

2/21/17 – The Open returns in 2020 from The Golf Channel – http://bit.ly/2lMl5Ro

St. Enodoc GC

10/15/12 – Golfing World – https://youtu.be/7RHFiQqhFzE

11/14/13 – Hole flyovers:

St. George’s Hill GC

9/12/13 – Golfing World – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vVlxF4_BFMg

10/8/13 – GolfBug TV – https://youtu.be/iEo2TPIstdE

Sunningdale GC

8/11/13 – Holden Golf World – https://youtu.be/5xVpbfWeKrc

Woburn GC

4/2/14 – Golfing World – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DFbKe4ckh5A

IRELAND

Ardglass GC

5/22/15 – Discover Northern Ireland’s Ultimate 18: 1th hole – https://youtu.be/tK-H2WsfiK8

Ballybunion GC

6/5/08 – Course tour from Hidden Links – https://youtu.be/U4ku4-Wz2O0

Ballycastle GC

5/22/15 – Discover Northern Ireland’s Ultimate 18: 2nd hole – https://youtu.be/8DTGt3ZSn5Y

Ballyliffin Golf Club

11/28/14 – Bird’s eye view footage and club description from Peter Homer – https://youtu.be/mrQ4qN5Fers

12/16/16 – Drone footage from Perry Golf & Travel – https://youtu.be/qiK33AsgkK0

Belvoir Park GC

5/22/15 – Discover Northern Ireland’s Ultimate 18: 8th hole – https://youtu.be/UZTbHuxyHos

Cairndhu GC

5/22/15 – Discover Northern Ireland’s Ultimate 18: 2nd hole – https://youtu.be/8DTGt3ZSn5Y

Castlerock GC

5/22/15 – Discover Northern Ireland’s Ultimate 18: 8th hole – https://youtu.be/kWnAtWvOht4

Dungannon GC

5/24/15 – Discover Northern Ireland’s Ultimate 18: 9th hole – https://youtu.be/M9Isu1JqTAg

Galgorm Castle GC

5/24/15 – Discover Northern Ireland’s Ultimate 18: 13th hole – https://youtu.be/M9Isu1JqTAg

Hollywood GC

5/22/15 – Discover Northern Ireland’s Ultimate 18: 17th hole – https://youtu.be/UZTbHuxyHos

Kirkistown Castle GC

5/24/15 – Discover Northern Ireland’s Ultimate 18: 10th hole – https://youtu.be/0_-HLe9rZVM

Lahinch Golf Club

10/21/15 – Insight and overview from PerryGolf and Travel – https://youtu.be/8Ie3PrGWUmE

Lough Erne Resort – Faldo Championship Course

5/24/15 – Discover Northern Ireland’s Ultimate 18: 10th hole – https://youtu.be/M9Isu1JqTAg

Malone GC

5/22/15 – Discover Northern Ireland’s Ultimate 18: 18th hole – https://youtu.be/8DTGt3ZSn5Y

Old Head Golf Links

6/6/08 – Course tour from Hidden Links – https://youtu.be/xWyM9gGiVW8

4/13/11 –  Course tour from American Singles Golf – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z3i1c32Bo90

Portstewart GC

5/22/15 – Discover Northern Ireland’s Ultimate 18: 1st and 2nd holes – https://youtu.be/kWnAtWvOht4

Royal Belfast GC

5/22/15 – Discover Northern Ireland’s Ultimate 18: 13th hole – https://youtu.be/UZTbHuxyHos

Royal County Down GC

9/11/13 – Photo tour from Ben Sargent – https://youtu.be/VugB08TNABQ

5/22/15 – Discover Northern Ireland’s Ultimate 18: 4th and 9th holes – https://youtu.be/tK-H2WsfiK8

10/21/15 – Photos and course description from PerryGolf & Travel – https://youtu.be/uKQgCUQ9uaY

Royal Portrush GC

7/22/12 – Sports Inc course detail – https://youtu.be/gp-lvFWdp8o

5/24/15 – Discover Northern Ireland’s Ultimate 18: 13th and 14th holes – https://youtu.be/0_-HLe9rZVM

10/20/15 – History and detail of the 148th Open Championship from The Open – https://youtu.be/uOH5WfyBsOw

1/14/16 – Course Changes flyover – http://www.wildatlanticgolf.com/2016/01/video-first-aerial-look-at-royal.html

Waterville Golf Links

9/17/15 – Golfing World – https://youtu.be/mbX2vTj0ipQ

NORTHERN IRELAND

Coming Soon…

WALES

Celtic Manor

2/26/09 – European Golf Design’s Ross McMurray – https://youtu.be/gSgJIQ8WAB4

Royal Porthcawl

7/23/14 – Golfing World – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2TXUXQ2RR3E


THE CONTINENT

(Listed alphabetically by country and course)

BULGARIA

Thracian Cliffs

4/27/16 – Drone footage from HighVision – https://youtu.be/TukOCSCC2Y0

DENMARK

Holstebro GC

7/7/14 – Golfing World – https://youtu.be/ABT0XS1AFXY

Horsholm GC

6/24/14 – Golfing World – https://youtu.be/Moexw6NeR2g

Lyngbygaard GC

6/29/14 – Golfing World – https://youtu.be/_U5pvdgyCH8

FRANCE

Le Golf National

8/7/14 – Golfing World – https://youtu.be/iYo5InbTZOQ

11/26/16 – Profile from LinksVideo.net – https://youtu.be/cEXwm63H4MY

St. Emilion

8/15/14 – Interview with course ownership on Golfing World – https://youtu.be/l5CDi5JNsgI

9/30/14 – Tom Doak on Golfing World – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=74wXlpc2DKo

10/28/15 – Interview with Tom Doak at 2:00 mark – https://youtu.be/qrv8_g8TwGI

NORWAY

Lofoten Links

12/1/16 – First hole flyover – https://youtu.be/zX_dbp1ZlEY

12/1/16 – Second hole flyover – https://youtu.be/HBt4nZyHd8Q

12/1/16 – Course flyovers – https://youtu.be/AV1wc4woJjs

12/13/16 – Third hole flyover – https://youtu.be/Wct4pTmklFY

12/15/16 – Fourth hole flyover – https://youtu.be/gRMjDKorIm4

12/19/16 – Fifth hole flyover – https://youtu.be/lIwqRu13K5Y

12/19/16 – Twelfth hole flyover – https://youtu.be/KHiTfUBanPc


MORE GCA VIDEO ARCHIVES:

 

 

Copyright 2017 – Jason Way, GeekedOnGolf


5 Comments

Ain’t It Grand – Opening Day at Sand Valley

Since my last Sand Valley post, I have had the privilege of making two more visits.  The first, in November of last year was a special non-playing treat.  I was invited by Michael Keiser to walk a routing on a parcel of land that is being considered for a future course with the architect, his associate, several Superintendents, and my good buddy Charlie.

SandValley-BenCrenshaw1.jpegThe day started brilliantly, as I ran into one of my favorite players, who is also half of my favorite modern architecture team – Ben Crenshaw.  Everything you have heard about Mr. Crenshaw’s kindness and generosity is true.  Although he had work to do that day on the Sand Valley’s short course, he graciously talked golf courses, architecture and history with Charlie and me for much longer than he needed to.  Truly, a class act.

It got even better from there, as I got a chance to try and understand what strikes me as the most magical part of golf course architecture – routing.  Truth be told, I am still mystified by how an architect can look at land covered with trees and vegetation, and with only a topographical map to guide them, find golf holes.  These pros patiently explained the holes and answered our questions, and I loved every minute of it.

What struck me most on this visit to Sand Valley was the pace of progress that Michael, Craig, and the team are achieving.  It is staggering, with no evidence of a sacrifice in quality.  By the time Charlie and I hit the road back to Chicago, I was counting the moments until the Grand Opening in the spring.


OPENING DAY

For what has become an annual spring pilgrimage for us, Peter K. and I set out early so that we could make a critical pit stop on the way to Sand Valley for opening day.  As I have said before, going into central Wisconsin without visiting Lawsonia Links is a mistake as big as Lawsonia’s massive features.  The loss of sleep is a small price to pay for the opportunity to walk the fairways of the most underrated golf course in America.

Lawsonia6-FairwayBunker.jpeg

After a chilly but joyful morning on the Links, we made our way to Sand Valley and upon arrival, I was immediately struck again by the progress that has been achieved since autumn.  Infrastructure, lodging, Mammoth Dunes…everything continues to move forward at an astounding pace.

We made our way to the first tee and were given a warm welcome by Michael, Chris, Glen, and Michael.  As an aside, if there is a person working at that resort who is not friendly and happy, I have yet to meet them.  The cold and blustery weather did nothing to diminish the excitement as group after group went off the first tee with a warm thank you and handshake from the Keisers.

It was fun to see members of the media like Andy North, Ashley Mayo, and Adam Lawrence having their Sand Valley experiences.  It was even more fun to meet Bill Coore, Jim Craig, and Ryan Farrow and quickly chat about their progress on the 17-hole short course.  But the most fun of all was undoubtedly heading out to hike Mammoth Dunes, and then play around and around on Sand Valley with my geek buddies Peter, Charlie and Vaughn.

SAND VALLEY

SandValley-Aerial-JC.jpeg

Photo by Jon Cavalier

Although I have made several previous visits to Sand Valley, this was the first time that I played the entire course.  Superintendent Rob Duhm and his crew have done an outstanding job with the grow-in, getting the course ready to be on display for the event.  Some areas are farther along than others, which makes me even more excited to go back and play the course as it matures over the years to come.  Jens Jensen and his team are also doing exciting work on the ecological restoration.  Although Sand Valley is largely two-tone right now, it promises to have additional explosions of color throughout the seasons as the native plantings establish.

Having played quite a few Coore & Crenshaw courses to date, there are familiar stylistic and visual themes evident on the course.  These themes are tried and true, and they never get old for me.  Beyond the familiar though, Sand Valley also possesses holes like the 7th and 17th that are so unique, that even the most well-traveled of golf geeks will be surprised and astounded.

And finally, the variability of the wind direction and speed, coupled with multiple teeing options on every hole, mean that the thoughtful player can play one version of the course in the morning, and an entirely different version in the afternoon.  As my buddy Peter says, it is the perfect course to just go around and around and around.  Following are my first set of hole-by-hole photos of the entire course, with a little help from Peter and Jon Cavalier.  The current plan is to head back for an autumn visit to catch another look.  Enjoy, and stay tuned for more to come.

(click on images to enlarge)

Hole 1 – Par 4 – 325 yards

SandValley1-TeeStairs.jpeg

The dramatic sand barren terrain with a ribbon of Coore & Crenshaw sculpted green invites the player to begin anew the adventure of this greatest of games.  The 1st is a gentle handshake from the tee – shortish, with ample area to land that first nervous drive of the day.  Gentility goes right out the window on the uphill approach to a small tiered green flanked by nasty bunkers.  Sand Valley’s opener gives the player a full preview of the look, feel, and strategic demands to come.

Hole 2 – Par 4 – 395 yards

SandValley2-Approach.jpeg

Word around the campfire is that this two-shotter is inspired by the opener at Pine Valley.  The player must choose off the tee – angle of approach or shorter approach distance.  Can’t have both.  Classic strategy.  The approach on the 2nd plays uphill over two large cross-bunkers to an outstanding green that slopes from high back right to low front left.  Awkward approach angles and whipping winds can lead to a missed green. Steep slopes left, right, and back require creativity and deft touch for any chance at an up-and-down.

Hole 3 – Par 3 – 192 yards

SandValley3-BackLeft.jpeg

Guarded front-right by a large mound and left by a bunker, the third requires a solidly struck tee ball to find the green.  A miss right on the 3rd bounds into a collection area.  The mound comes into play again as the player must decide how to use it or avoid it to cozy up a recovery.  The bunker left begins short of the green and runs the full length.  All manner of awkward bunker shots are possible for tee shots that stray left.  The 3rd is the first of an outstanding set of Coore-Crenshaw one-shotters.

Hole 4 – Par 5 – 557 yards

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The first of Sand Valley’s three-shotters plays uphill over rumpled ground to a green set just below one of the high points on the course.  A steady and visually arresting climb.  The subtly contoured green is surrounded by artful bunkers and playable slopes.  Approach through the air or along the ground are both options.  Just enough choice to add the mental confusion to the mix that C&C prize so highly.  Climbing the hill to the 5th tee, a glance back provides another reminder of the grand scale of this magnificent land that was underneath a glacial lake for thousands of years.

Hole 5 – Par 3 – 164 yards

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A dramatic reveal awaits the player upon reaching the hilltop.  The domed green lies below, with the 6th hole to the right, the alternate 6th to the left, and an expanse of sand barren beyond.  Breathtaking and pulse quickening, all at once.  There are no easy putts on the 5th green, and par is a good score.  One final look back at the tee above reinforces just how exciting the golf adventure at Sand Valley is.  No ocean necessary.

Hole 6 – Par 4 – 445 yards

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Photo by Jon Cavalier

The subtle brilliance of this hole begins in the rumpled fairway, and the angles created by its staggered bunkers.  Line and distance options abound, demanding thought and execution.  The 6th culminates with a large, outstanding green, fronted right by a bunker and surrounded by slopes and runoffs. Use the contours skillfully, and access to all pins is available.  Miss your mark, and a tough up-and-down awaits.

Hole 7 – Par 5 – 536 yards

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The player is confronted on the 7th tee with a massive sand dune running down the right and an angled uphill fairway that obscures the landing area for longer hitters.  The fairway is split by a long angular bunker.  Players not able to reach the green in two must decide which route to take.  That decision is based on pin position and considerations of sight line vs proximity.  The mind is fully engaged at this point.  The green is protected front right by a large mound and bunker that makes a back right pin difficult to access from the lower right fairway, even from shorter distances.  A brilliant hole, the 7th is visually arresting and rich in strategy.  It is playable at all skill levels, providing options for conservative or aggressive play.  Birdie and double bogey are equally possible.  One of my all-time favorite C&C five pars.

Hole 8 – Par 3 – 115 yards

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This shortie plays dramatically up to a skyline green, and brings to mind thoughts of Sand Hills.  The green is guarded short right by a bunker that could more accurately be described as a sandy chasm of doom.  The tee shot might be short, but the penalty for a weak flare is LONG.  The 8th green is deceptively deep and contoured into sections.  Well placed shots gather into birdie range.  End up in the wrong section, and a putting adventure awaits.  MacKenzie and Maxwell would approve of this hole, I am sure.

Hole 9 – Par 4 – 290 yards

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This short-four is driveable, but also offers two flat spots left and right amidst the heaving fairway that the thoughtful player can use to optimize approach position.  Hug the fairway bunker right to access left pin positions, or press a bit further up the left to get the perfect angle to the back right.  As with all great golf holes, strategy unfolds from the green backward, and the 9th fits that bill.  Bill Coore personally poured every ounce of his art and craftsmanship into this wonderful green, fine tuning for hours on end to give it the fullest flavor.  How fortunate we are for his dedication to the pursuit of perfection.

Hole 10 – Par 5 – 541 yards

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Playing downhill to a fairway divided by a large centerline bunker, C&C again confront the player with a choice on this five-par.  High right for better visibility, or low left for better angle.  The fairway right is bordered by a large bunker that connects to the sand barren.  An imposing look, and even more imposing recovery for shots that don’t make the carry.  The large green on the 10th sits in a bowl and has several distinct sections. Getting home in two is no guarantee of a birdie.  Flatstick game must be on point.

Hole 11 – Par 4 – 387 yards

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Photo by Jon Cavalier

This cape style hole narrows as it approaches the green, tempting the player to bite off more than may be advisable.  The right side of the green runs off sharply.  An approach that misses by a foot can end up 20+ paces down the hill, leaving the player with endless options for getting back up to the green.  Simple brilliance.

Hole 12 – Par 5 – 452 yards

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This half-par hole was apparently the source of lively debate during construction.  Oh to be a fly on that wall.  Big hitters can take their drives over the center trees leaving the green very much in reach.  The bunker front center was a late addition to give players a moment of pause on the approach to this elevated green.  The high left slope can be used to feed balls into the center of the green.  But get too cute and overshoot your mark and you might find yourself in the deep runoff behind the green.  Played smartly, the 12th is an easy par with a solid chance for birdie.  If only this game were that simple.

Hole 13 – Par 4 – 383 yards

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This simple little hole bends gently left and heads uphill to a killer skyline green.  It is a moment of pause before the player takes on the thrill-ride closing stretch.

Hole 14 – Par 3 – 175 yards

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This one-shotter is one of my all-time Coore-Crenshaw favorites.  It plays downhill to a slightly angled and canted green that sits in an intimate spot among the sand barrens and trees.  The green is surrounded on three sides by sand, with those glorious C&C bunker edges that their expert shapers never fail to deliver.  Perhaps it’s just me, but the shaping artistry seems to come out ideally with fescue.  I heart fescue.  The elevated tee is exposed to the wind, but the green is set down where the wind swirls.  Judging the wind properly is as much luck as it is skill.  The cant and subtle internal contours of this green conspire to make holing putts a second guessing game.  Par here is a good score, and birdies a big bonus.

Hole 15 – Par 4 – 392 yards

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The 15th is a gentle dogleg left that plays along relatively flat ground to a wonderful green site.  The green is fronted by two humps.  In a double-play on this familiar theme, strategy on the hole is dictated all the way back to the tee based on where the pin is in relation to these features.  Complexity born of simplicity.  The green on the 15th features some of the most interesting contours on the course, especially taking into account the surrounds.  Feel like getting creative with the flat stick?  This is your spot.

Hole 16 – Par 4 – 429 yards

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The strategy on this terrific hole is defined by two centerline bunkers.  The first, in the drive zone, can be challenged or skirted, depending on the day’s wind.  The second stands guard in front of the skyline green.  Savvy players can access certain pins by playing long and using the back left slope.  A stellar hole that rewards confident and creative shot-making.

Hole 17 – Par 3 – 215 yards

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Photo by Jon Cavalier

The final of Sand Valley’s first rate one-shotters is its most impressive.  It can play anywhere from 150-250 yards, up a rise and then back down into a massive punchbowl.  The bowl will accept all shapes and types of shots.  Cresting the hill does not ensure a favorable outcome though.  The huge green is divided into plateaus and hollows, leaving open to the player the possibility of a lag putt more daunting than the tee shot.  Pictures don’t do justice to the awe that the 17th green inspires.  It is nothing short of jaw-dropping and I dare say that this hole is the coolest long par-3 in America that is not on the Monterey Peninsula.

Hole 18 – Par 5 – 507 yards

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A hair-raising ascent back to the high point of the property, the closer offers a final legitimate opportunity for birdie (and double).  The 18th fairway is littered with signature Coore-Crenshaw bunkers, each beautiful and terrible in their own right.  The massive final green is multi-tiered and wraps around the large bunker right.  The variety of pin locations makes the hole play drastically differently from one loop to the next.  A strong close to an outstanding golf course.

Circling back to my initial point about the maturation process – Sand Valley is already a great course.  From both a playability perspective and visually, it still has upside as vast as the land on which it sits.  I will be a regular visitor, no doubt.

MAMMOTH DUNES

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A 6-hole preview loop was open and ready for play on Opening Day.  Peter and I decided to leave the clubs in the car and instead got permission to walk the entire Mammoth Dunes routing.  The holes were in various stages of completion – some growing in, some in finished shaping and seeding, some getting irrigation, and some still only rough shaped.

Much of the preliminary talk from David McLay Kidd about Mammoth Dunes has been about the dramatic scale of the land and the course.  Stepping onto the first tee, that scale is evident, and it is indeed breathtaking.  What I was keen to find out by walking the rest of the routing though was, would the course have more than just drama?  Would it have the strategic intricacy and attention to detail that separates good courses from the truly great?  Going big is fine, and it makes an impression, but I find that the courses that leaving a lasting imprint on me also get the little things right.

Even in its current state of construction, I feel comfortable sharing my impression that the DMK is getting the details right, and that Mammoth Dunes promises to be a special golf course.  More importantly for the resort, the second course has a distinct style from the first, which is great news for lovers of variety.  I can already imagine the golf geeks debating which course is the best.

A few photos from our walk…

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There are huge greens on the course that will challenge creative shot-making and lag putting, but they are not all big.  David has thrown surprises into the mix.

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As it matures, the par-3 16th continues to blow me away.  We saw evidence of other one-shotters in the mix that will be equally fantastic.

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Case in point.

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Creative flourishes can be found throughout, including this bunker built from an old homestead cellar.

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The course has the feel of an adventure hike.  When David said that he felt that his job was to get the player to explore the property, on Mammoth Dunes he has done his job well with the routing.  It is going to be a wonderful place to get lost for a few hours.


CONCLUSION

Sand Valley, the course and the resort, are already receiving heaps of praise and accolades.  Some argue that it is premature to draw such conclusions.  I agree – not because of running the risk of overrating what Sand Valley is, but rather because of the risk of underrating what it will become.  Instead of rushing to conclusions, it seems best to me to continue watching the evolution of this special place, playing its wide and winding fairways, and perhaps taking a moment to sit back and feel grateful for what the Keiser family is attempting to accomplish.

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This much is now certain.  It is a wonderful time to be a Midwest golfer.  The public has access to championship venues like Whistling Straights and Erin Hills, as well as brilliant under-the-radar gems like Lawsonia Links, Belvedere and Ravisloe.  On both sides of lake, resort owners continue to push forward to offer architecturally exciting courses – Sand Valley, Mammoth Dunes, The Loop, Arcadia Bluffs South, Stoatin Brae…the hits just keep on coming.

In order to have a golf geeky adventure of the first order, a player needs only hop in the car and hit the road.


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Copyright 2017 – Jason Way, GeekedOnGolf