Geeked on Golf


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Musings on Greenkeeping

Okay, that title is a bit click-baity.  These musings are not exactly about greenkeeping.  I know only enough to be dangerous.  What I do know with certainty is that a Golf Course Superintendent’s job is hard.

I have the good fortune of counting among my friends quite a few greenkeepers.  I watch them work and am perpetually impressed by how they pour their hearts into their work.  We players reap the rewards.  The following musings are tips intended to help players be significantly cooler than they often are to their Superintendents.  Necessarily, the tone of these musings is a bit preachy.  Forgive me – some folks need a tough love talking-to.

TIP #1 – Say “Thank You”

When you see your Super out on the course, if you really want to interrupt their work to have a chat, be cool.  Comments like, “Thanks for the hard work”, and “The course is playing great today”, and “How’s the family?” are appropriate.  Your critique of the course conditions that day are not.  Two reasons why.  The first is that feedback gathering is what your Green Chairman is for.  They take it all in, filter, prioritize and collaborate with your Superintendent to present the best conditions possible.  If your course is overseen by a benevolent dictator like my home course, then save your breath.  The second, and much more important reason, is that a Superintendent out on the course is a person in their happy place.  Just like you when you are playing.  They aren’t on the course to provide mobile suggestion box accessibility services for you.  It would be inappropriate and rude for a member of the maintenance crew to roll up and give you feedback on your swing sequence in the middle of the round.  See where I’m going with this?

In the unlikely event that your observations are so mission critical that the normal channels just won’t cut it, then make an appointment to talk to your Super.  Perhaps even buy them lunch.  Seem like too much trouble?  Then just stick to “Thank you”.

TIP #2 – You Don’t Know Greenkeeping

Perhaps you are a great businessperson, lawyer, doctor, or other professional.  I celebrate your success, truly and sincerely.  Your profession is not greenkeeping though, and whatever expertise you may have does not translate to agronomy and golf course maintenance.  Further, being good at hitting a golf ball does not mean that you know anything about doing the Superintendent’s job.

Don’t get me wrong.  I am not saying that players can’t tell the difference between good and poor conditions, and I am not saying that all Superintendents do a great job all the time.  What I am saying is that identifying problems is the easy part.  If you’ve noticed, they already have too.  What to do about those problems is an entirely different matter about which most players have no clue.  It’s therefore best to have some humility, let the experts do their job, and enjoy your round.

TIP #3 – Fast vs. True

Issues with pace of play and enjoyment of the game associated with stimpmeter obsession and the push for faster greens are well documented.  The truth is that most players are not skilled enough to handle greens much over 10 anyway, so stop asking your Super for those PGA Tour conditions.  Pushing the greens for speed increases cost, stresses turf, and makes your Superintendent’s job more difficult.  All for ego.  Golf is hard enough without those extra half-dozen three putts, as well as the lasting mental anguish for both you and your playing partners who had to watch.

What we should be asking for are putting surfaces that roll true.  There is a difference between fast and true, and the latter is ideal for almost all players.  Don’t you want to make more putts?  Of course you do.  Change your ask, and your Superintendent will happily oblige.  The turf will be happier too.

TIP #4 – Embrace the Seasons

Regardless of where you live, changing weather patterns affect your golf course.  Think of these patterns as seasons, and embrace seasonal changes.  The changes mean variety, and variety is the essence of golf’s goodness.

Your course is not supposed to look and play the same every day.  Expecting your Superintendent to deliver the same conditions rain or shine, monsoon or drought, spring, summer, and fall is an impossible standard.  You’ll stress out the staff, and waste money and resources in the process.  Instead, remember that part of the beauty of golf is that it takes us outside to get in touch with nature in all its varied glory.  Natural playing conditions, depending on the weather and season, are the standard that we should desire.

TIP #5 – The Course is for Playing

Golf courses are things of beauty.  They are a blend of art and science, and they are a joy to look at.  However, let’s not forget that a golf course is fundamentally a field of play.  It is for playing, first and foremost, and there are times when the best playing conditions might not be generally accepted as the prettiest.

Your Superintendent’s job is to provide the best possible playing surfaces.  If those surfaces can be pretty too, that’s great.  But if something has to give, give up the looks for the playability.  What is the point of a pretty green fairway if your drive plugs when it lands?  What is the point of having pretty trees and flowers if they detract from having the resources necessary to deliver putting surfaces that roll true?  Gardens are for pretty.  Courses are for play.

TIP #6 – Resources Must Match Expectations

In the unlikely event that you are reading this post while wearing your Augusta National member’s jacket, congrats.  Couldn’t be happier for you and the unlimited resources you are able to give to your Superintendent.  For everyone else, your course is not Augusta, and does not have those resources.

Do you know what your course’s maintenance budget is?  Do you know how that budget compares to other courses you play or see?  It’s helpful to know these numbers to give context to your expectations.  We all want our Superintendents to get the highest level of quality out of the resources they have.  Fair enough.  The best Supers are indeed miracle workers with stretching dollars and man hours.  The bottom line is that our expectations for playing conditions need to be reasonably aligned with available resources.

You on a beer budget?  Brother, you ain’t drinking champagne.

Go Out and Play

That wasn’t so bad, was it?  Just a few simple tips to give you the right mindset to actually be a friend to your Greenkeeper.  Practice it like your short game, and your time on the course will feel more like the privilege that it is.

During your time off the course, if you want to enhance your perspective by learning the basics of golf course architecture, I recommend Andy Johnson’s Architecture 101 series on The Fried Egg, and his podcast with Tom Doak.  To dive even deeper, grab yourself a book off the Geek’s Library shelves.


MORE GEEKED ON GOLF MUSINGS:

 

 

Copyright 2018 – Jason Way, GeekedOnGolf


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Journey Along the Shores – Part 16 (Super Changes)

There is only one constant in life – change.  Life at Canal Shores is no different.  The course continues to evolve, as do our plans for its future.  This season, those plans changed when we learned that our team was not going to be the same.  Tom Tully, our Superintendent, decided to relocate to Colorado.  He will be missed.

After a brief moment of panic, the search for Tom’s replacement began.  Our Board President Chris Carey and Grounds Chair Steve Neumann shoulder the work, and scored us a winner – Tony Frandria.  Tony is a highly experienced Greenkeeper, who was most recently at Glen View Club.

I am excited to be collaborating with Tony and wanted to learn more about him.  In the midst of getting prepared for the season, he gracious agreed to a GoG interview.

Before getting to the interview, there is more change news to spread – the Canal Shores Grounds Committee now has its own blog that will have frequent updates on course improvements, volunteer opportunities, master planning and more.  Check it out here.  I will continue to write about golf geeky aspects of the Canal Shores transformation, but for the full story, the G&G Blog is the place to go.

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Our volunteer Jeff Hapner created multiple headers for the blog and this one didn’t make the cut.  It was too good not to share (yes, that is Steve Neumann playing the role of Spackler).

On to Tony’s interview…


THE INTERVIEW

How did you get introduced to golf?

When I was a Senior in High School, the town I grew up in, Palos Hills IL, built a 9-Hole municipal golf course (Palos Hills Municipal Golf Course).  I was looking for a summer job so I went over to the course when it opened to see if they had any openings for summer help.  I started working in the Pro-Shop, which at first was just a small trailer, taking tee times, working in the snack shop, driving the beverage cart, washing golf carts and then eventually working on the grounds.  I got my first set of clubs soon after and began to play golf every day.  The best part about the job was that it was free to play!  That’s when I developed a passion for the game, and that’s when I also took a real interest in working on the golf course grounds.  As time has passed my passion for the game remains, but I currently don’t play as much golf as I did when I was younger.  I plan to change that moving forward, but I still have a tremendous passion, admiration and respect for the game of golf.

When did you know that the game had a hold on you?

The 1991 Ryder Cup matches at Kiawah Island “The War on the Shore”– that was when I really began to love and appreciate the competition and truly understood the deep passion that the game of golf can bring out in people.

What are the biggest lessons you have learned in your career thus far?

There are several lessons I’ve learned in my career, but the most important I would say is communication on so many different levels is imperative.  Being transparent with the people you represent is also important.  People want to know what’s going on – that’s why I really enjoy sharing information to let people know what they can expect when they come out to the golf course.

Another lesson I’ve learned is you can’t be too hard on yourself – I tend to wear my heart on my sleeve and sometimes take things too seriously.  That can be a good trait, but you must learn how to manage yours and your employers’ expectations because there are so many factors that you can’t control when caring for a golf course – like weather!

The other lesson I would say is something that a mentor and great friend of mine told me a long time ago.  Don’t fall too much in love with the property because it’s not yours.  One day you will leave the course for whatever reason, but the course will remain and the operation will go on without you. The most important thing is that you do the very best job you can during your tenure so you can leave the course in great shape when you move on and someone else takes the reigns.  Then, hopefully you’ll be able to look back at your achievements and be proud of what you and your team accomplished.

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Where do you see agronomy and course maintenance headed from here?

Water usage is going to become a greater and greater issue as time goes on.  Creating agronomical conditions that can allow turf to thrive with less water use is going to be a huge challenge moving forward.  Pesticide and fertilizer usages are also becoming more and more scrutinized which challenges turfgrass breeders to develop more sustainable turf species that need less water, are more disease resistant, and tolerant to adverse weather conditions.

We as turfgrass professionals, as well as golfers, must manage aesthetic expectations and accept the fact that lush/green turf doesn’t necessarily promote the best playing conditions.  I like the “firm and fast” slogan – which is also better for the environment.

The technology we have at our fingertips is also moving very fast.  Now there are computer programs for just about everything – programs that track your chemical, fertilizer and water usages. Programs that track labor, equipment maintenance, and weather.

Turf equipment is also becoming more and more complex as nearly everything has some sort of computer module that operates the engine, cutting units, etc.  It’s all commonplace now.  Therefore, it’s very important to have a solid Equipment Technician on staff in some capacity to maintain the multifaceted pieces of equipment needed to maintain fine Turfgrass.

It’s vital to keep up with these trends, and in the future, I’m hoping to implement many of the technologies currently available to the Canal Shores operation.

You have worked with Dave Esler and Jim Urbina.  What is it like to collaborate with architects of that caliber?

I’ve been blessed to have worked with these two fine architects.  Both have their own style and personality, and like me, they possess an unbelievable passion for classic “Golden Age” golf course architecture.

The most significant lesson I learned working with these two guys in particular is that I needed to allow them to do their job and to support their vision, but to also offer input on design aspirations that might affect future maintenance.  Golf course architects are basically artists and the golf course is their canvas.  When a golf course engages an architect, they do so for their design expertise, so the architect must be allotted the space to compile multiple renderings and concepts, particularly in the early stages.  It’s important to allow them to be creative without too much scrutiny from outside sources.

Why did you decide to take on the Canal Shores opportunity?

The future vision for the property is what truly intrigued me about the position.  In my career, I’ve planned and managed several high end and multi-faceted golf course projects.  I love planning and executing projects – it’s something within our profession that can add variety to the responsibility of everyday maintenance.  The proposed project at Canal Shores is so unique, and the passion I felt from Chris and Steve during the interview process was really refreshing.

I’ve worked at three private country clubs in my career – this opportunity will also allow me to utilize my experiences in the private sector to build the Grounds Department into an even better functioning facet of the overall facility – much the same as a country club’s Grounds & Greens Department, but on a lesser scale considering the size of the property at Canal Shores is much smaller than what I’ve worked with in my past experiences.

What do you anticipate being the biggest “shock to your system” coming to Canal Shores after 13 years at a prestigious club like Glen View?

First and foremost is obviously the budget.  Canal Shores’s budget is significantly less than what the budget was at GVC.  This isn’t a negative thing, as you must take into consideration the expectations of the golfer, the size of the property and the overall dynamics of the operation on a 12-month basis.

At GVC we had activities occurring all year long. When the golf course closed for the season we had to maintain the grounds surrounding the fall and winter activities available to members such as the paddle tennis facility, skeet and trap shooting, winter ice skating, sledding hill, cross country skiing, and snow removal so it was necessary to keep a sizable staff on year-round.

Canal Shores is clearly a much different operation.  The size of the property is 20% the size of GVC, and the golfer expectations will vary greatly from a private country club.  When the snow flies the operation will mostly be dormant.  I look forward to managing every dollar wisely to exceed expectations in both property maintenance and the overall golf experience of each golfer’s visit.

What are the keys to successfully managing a large golf course construction project or renovation?

Planning and communication.  I’ve seen so many projects within the industry fail due to improper planning and communications.  If the plan isn’t properly vetted in can end up drastically over budget and even if it turns out great, in the end, being over budget is never a good thing.  Every last detail must be properly planned for and budgeted.

It’s also important that the planning is taken on by a sub-committee of the Grounds and Greens Committee.  From my past experiences, I’ve learned that too many irons in the fire can be detrimental to the success of any project, particularly large scale projects with a lot of moving parts.  Typically, four or five committee Members along with the Golf Course Superintendent, Construction Project Manager, and Golf Course Architect are plenty for a successful sub-committee.

It’s also important to always budget for the unexpected – I like to call it “contingency budgeting” as it’s a certainty that some sort of adverse situation will arise at some point during the project that will cost money to rectify.

Communication is extremely vital when taking on a large-scale project.  The clientele should be kept in the loop as much as possible.  Taking pictures and posting them on a blog is a great way to easily allow others to keep up with what’s occurring and how the project is progressing.

What do you love about practicing your craft?

The job can become pretty stressful at times, but when a plan comes together and things look great and the course is playing well, the job is really rewarding.  It’s also a real privilege to be able to work outside and not be confined to an office all day.  I would go crazy if I were locked in an office all day.  I really enjoy driving around the course in the evenings near dusk – there’s something about watching the sun set on the golf course that just relaxes me.

What courses do you most want to see or play next?

I’m extremely fortunate to have developed relationships with so many talented Superintendents around the country.  These relationships allowed me to visit some of the finest courses in America and to become part of a network of Superintendents that’s become a brotherhood.

I’ve been fortunate enough to have visited some great courses throughout my career – Oakmont, Merion, Pine Valley, Saucon Valley, Augusta National, Riviera, Cypress Point, Oak Hill, Winged Foot, Philadelphia Country Club, Huntington Valley, Muirfield Village, just to name a few off the top of my head.

I’ve never been to Long Island though – so I would love to see Shinnecock Hills, Maidstone, and National Golf Links of America.  My colleague and former GCS at Chicago Golf Club Jon Jennings is the GCS at Shinnecock Hills – they’re hosting a US Open in two years, so hopefully that will be my chance to see Long Island as I plan to volunteer during the tournament.

I would also like to get to Scotland one day.

When you are not working or playing golf, how do you spend your time?

My family is extremely important to me, so when I’m not on the golf course I like to spend time with them.  My family and I are also die-hard Cubs fans so we try to get to as many games as we can throughout the year as well.  Go Cubs Go!!


More Journey Along the Shores posts:

 

 

 

Copyright 2017 – Jason Way, GeekedOnGolf


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GOLF HEAVEN ON EARTH – KINGSLEY

Early impressions from a new member at Northern Michigan’s modern gem, The Kingsley Club

My discovery of the Kingsley Club was just dumb luck.  On a buddies trip to Arcadia Bluffs and Crystal Downs, we needed a third course to play.  I stumbled across the Kingsley Club review on GolfClubAtlas.com – it looked interesting, so it was added to our itinerary.

Turning into the property off a dirt road, it was apparent that we had found a hidden gem.  Beyond the modest clubhouse lay rolling hills covered in wild flowers and fescue grass, with beautiful undulating fairways cutting through them.  For me, it was love at first sight – a feeling of exhilaration that I find anew every time I pull into the parking lot, and every time I step onto the first tee.

The original intent of this post was to give a course tour.  Between the GolfClubAtlas.com review and the Club’s website, that tour is thoroughly covered.  No need to redo what has already been well done. Instead, this post is about why Kingsley has touched me so deeply.  Why I believe that it embodies everything that is great about golf.

Kingsley is certainly challenging and fun to play, and the laid-back culture of the club enhances the experience for me.  But the profound sense of joy it evokes in me goes beyond fun.  What makes Kingsley so special?  Three words hint at the answer: Interest, Variety, and Beauty.

KINGSLEY IS INTERESTING

A good golf course catches the player’s interest on the first hole and keeps it throughout the round.  A truly great golf course like Kingsley keeps the player’s interest round after round, ad infinitum.  Its greatness is displayed to me in how it keeps my interest.  It is like a puzzle to attempt to solve.  It provides challenges of strategy and execution, along with a mixed bag of good and bad luck.

After I have played a really good round at a course, I often lose interest.  My experience at Kingsley has been just the opposite.  I have played some of my best golf there, and yet I still want more.  It is simply impossible to imagine getting bored walking those fairways.

These specifics top the list of what makes Kingsley interesting:

  • Blind shots – The property is hilly and Mike DeVries‘s routing takes advantage of the elevation changes to create numerous blind shots.  Blind shots quicken the pulse and provide interest.  There are few things quite as exciting in golf as hitting one’s shot, watching it disappear, and then taking the anticipatory walk to find out how it ended up.
  • Bouncing balls – The fairways and green complexes are gloriously undulating.  Coupled with fescue fairways and bent grass greens that drain well, the undulations provide bounces from tee to green that make the course unpredictable.  Superintendent Dan Lucas keeps the course in immaculate firm-and-fast condition, but it is not “manicured”.  Kingsley will hand players good and bad breaks according to its whim.  In golf, “fair” is another word for “predictable”.  Predictable gets boring quickly, and does not hold a player’s interest.  Kingsley is anything but predictable.
  • Distance and depth-perception – Elements of the course, in concert with the often windy Northern Michigan weather, make judging true distance and selecting clubs very challenging.  Even when playing repeatedly from the same spot, the shots are not the same.  One is never quite sure if the club is right.  Executing a confident shot in the face of that fundamental ambiguity is an interesting mental challenge indeed!

KINGSLEY OFFERS VARIETY

Variety is the spice of life.  It is also the hallmark of a great golf course.  From tee to green, from front nine to back, Kingsley has tremendous variety.

The course has a wide variety of hole lengths and is routed to maximize directional changes.  Factor in time of day and weather conditions, and Kingsley can play like an entirely different course from round to round.

Kingsley puts its variety on display:

  • On the tees – Each hole offers several teeing grounds that often differ not just in length, but in direction.  The player can choose to play each hole from wherever they wish.  The best example of tee variety is on the par 3 9th, which can play from 106 to 240+ yards from two groups of tee boxes that are set at 90 degree angles to one another.
  • On the greens – Kingsley has incredible variety in its green complexes.  Some are heavily bunkered, some have few or no bunkers.  Some greens accept ground approaches and recoveries, others are elevated to encourage aerial shots.  There is a wide range of green sizes and shapes, some with subtle interior contours, and others more dramatic.  The course has punchbowls, table-tops, crowns, horseshoes, double plateaus, and multi-tiers.
  • In the feel of the nines – The outward nine is routed through sand hills.  It is open and largely treeless.  The inward nine has a much different feel, wandering through trees.  Both nines feel expansive, but each has a distinct feel.  Playing at Kingsley is like playing at Pacific Dunes and Bandon Trails in the same round.

KINGSLEY IS BEAUTIFUL

Kingsley possesses a rugged, natural beauty that might not be appreciated by those accustomed only to manicured, parkland golf.  The minimalist first impression gives way as the course reveals contrasts of greens and browns, painted onto beautiful contours.

The grounds crew has painstakingly tended the native areas, planting fescue and wildflowers.  Players who visit frequently are treated throughout the year to an ever-changing show of colors that is at once visually arresting and appropriate to the overall look of the course.

From the minor details to the grand scheme, Kingsley’s wide open spaces further contrast sky and earth into one breathtaking view after another.  It is the perfect marriage of outstanding design, construction, and maintenance, with the natural beauty that makes people fall in love with Northern Michigan.

Interest, variety, beauty, and much more – the founders, Mike DeVries and Dan Lucas have put together the total package in a way that resonates deep down in my soul.  It is my golf heaven on earth, and I look forward to walking those fairways hundreds of times, for the rest of my life. It is my sincere hope that many others get to experience Kingsley’s greatness too.

Copyright 2015 – Jason Way, GeekedOnGolf


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THE SWEET SOUND OF CHAINSAWS

“As beautiful as trees are, and as fond as you and I are of them, we still must not lose sight of the fact that there is a limited place for them in golf. We must not allow our sentiments to crowd out the real intent of a golf course, that of providing fair playing conditions. If it in any way interferes with a properly played stroke, I think the tree is an unfair hazard and should not be allowed to stand.”
– Donald Ross, from Golf Has Never Failed Me

First things first – I love trees.  They are magical to me.  Growing up on Chicago’s North Shore and finally settling in Evanston, I have been fortunate to be surrounded by big, old trees all my life.  Time spent hiking in the woods of northern Michigan is second in enjoyment for me only to golf.

My tree-hugging tendencies having been disclosed, I have to agree with Mr. Ross 100%.  On many golf courses, over-planting and invasiveness of trees are a detractor – they create turf health issues, add to maintenance costs, hinder playability, and block sight-lines.  Further, when trees are overgrown, true specimens are not allowed to stand out, reducing aesthetic pleasure.

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What a shame it would be if the beauty of these specimens at Crystal Downs was lost in an overgrown tree line. (photo by Jon Cavalier)

In spite of high-profile tree removal victories such as at Oakmont, architects and superintendents are often saddled in their work by club memberships that apparently don’t know the difference in function and intent between a golf course and an arboretum.  To illustrate what they deal with, a superintendent friend of mine was confronted by a club member while overseeing tree removal and accused of “raping the golf course”.  The restoration of that same course, which included substantial tree removal, has subsequently been lauded by the members as an unequivocal success.

As the sunlight can better reach the turf once the trees are thinned, so is this page intended as an attempt to shine a light that gets through to tree-ignorant golfers.  Architects and superintendents are invited to share their tree removal before-and-after photos and I will keep them organized.  Hopefully, by creating such a resource with visual proof of the improvements, we can raise awareness and make the lives of GCAs and Supers a bit easier.

Photos and commentary can be submitted to me at jwizay1493@hotmail.com or via Twitter @jasonway1493.


TREE MANAGEMENT INSPIRATION

OAKMONT COUNTRY CLUB

Arguably, Oakmont was the original spark that got clubs to stop planting trees haphazardly, and start thinking about what proper tree management looked like for them.  Obviously, the outcome at Oakmont is at the far end of the tree removal spectrum, but the impact of what Superintendent Mark Kuhns did starting in 1993 with support of key members continues to reach far beyond the boundaries of their property.

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Click here to watch the Golf Channel story – How Oakmont Turned Back the Clock

ESSEX COUNTY CLUB

The most amazing transformation that I have personally witnessed through tree removal is at Essex County Club.  Before my first play of ECC, I studied up and saw pictures.  The course I encountered in 2015 was not the same as the one in the photos.  The Essex County membership and Superintendent Eric Richardson were already well on their way down the tree removal road, and they keep going.  I have been back to play annually, and every time I visit, my jaw hits the ground again.

Following are before-and-after photos provided to me by Eric illustrating the extent of commitment that ECC has to bringing out the uniqueness of Donald Ross’s New England masterwork.

(click on images to enlarge)

The rock hill that is the central feature of the property, as seen from the 1st fairway:

From the 10th fairway, revealing the hillside:

From the 11th tee, uncovering the hill behind the green:

Looking back to the 12th tee, the drive plays blind over the hill:

From the 12th fairway looking back, with the movement of the land and skyline revealed:

From the 15th tee, with trees replaced by Ross mounds to separate 15 from 16 fairway:

Before, during and after removal of trees on 17, uncovering the wild topography on which this short par-4 is built:

The view back toward 12 from the 18th tee, set on the hill top:

From the 18th tee, looking down the fairway as it tumbles between the hills:

OLD ELM CLUB 

The club where I grew up caddying has undergone an incredible transformation.  The collaboration of architects Drew Rogers and Dave Zinkand, General Manager Kevin Marion, and Superintendent Curtis James has dramatically opened up the property so that the work of Harry Colt and Donald Ross can truly shine.  It is not the course of my youth, and all the better for it.  If I can ever pin Curtis down, there will be photos to come…


TREE REMOVAL BEFORE-AND-AFTER

(click on mosaic images to enlarge)

BROADSTONE GOLF CLUB

2013-2014 Restoration by Frank Pont of Infinite Variety Golf Design.

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BRYN MAWR COUNTRY CLUB

2015 tree removal performed by Superintendent Brian Bossert as a continuation of a 2013 renovation by Jim Nagle of Forse Design. (Learn more about the project here)

CALIFORNIA GOLF CLUB OF SAN FRANCISCO

2008 Restoration by Kyle Phillips Golf Course Design

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CAMBERLY HEATH GOLF CLUB

Tree removal performed by grounds staff, video courtesy of Deputy Course Manager Graeme Roberts.

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COMMONWEALTH GOLF CLUB

Renovation work by Ogilvy, Clayton, Cocking and Meade.

Victoria-BeforeAfter

COUNTRY CLUB OF FAIRFIELD

1999-2000 Restoration by Bruce Hepner and Renaissance Golf Design (full course review on GolfClubAtlas.com).

COUNTRY CLUB OF PEORIA

2007-2008 Restoration by Mike Benkusky.  – According to Mike, more than 500 more trees have been removed since the renovation was completed, and the membership continues to love the new look and playability of the course.

Photos courtesy of Superintendent Michael Vessely, who continues to polish this special Langford & Moreau 9-holer.

GOLF CLUB DE HARDELOT

2014 Restoration by Infinite Variety Golf Design and Patrice Boissonnas (more pics and information at GolfClubAtlas.com)

Hardelot-BeforeAfter

THE LAKES

2007 Renovation by Ogilvy, Clayton, Cocking and Meade.

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THE LINKS AT LAWSONIA

2013 – 2014 restoration of this Langford & Moreau gem by Jim Nagle of Forse Design. Before pic courtesy of Scott LaPlant.

LINLITHGOW GOLF CLUB

2015 off-season tree removal performed by Course Manager Grant Peters

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LOS ANGELES COUNTRY CLUB (NORTH)

2009-2010 Restoration by Hanse Golf Course Design with Geoff Shackelford (see the LinksGems Tour here)

LULU COUNTRY CLUB

December 2017 Tweet from the Lulu team (@lulucountryclub).  Superintendent Matthew Stout and his crew have been doing tremendous work polishing up this Donald Ross gem.

MEADOW CLUB

July 2015 tweet from the Meadow Club Grounds Dept. (@meadow1927). In collaboration with Mike DeVries, Superintendent Sean Tully and his staff are bringing out every bit of beauty from this architectural treasure.

MeadowClub-BeforeAfter.jpg OAK HILL COUNTRY CLUB

June 2016 Tweet from Superintendent Jeff Corcoran (@ohccturf1), before and after pictures of #15 on the West course.

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OLD TOWN CLUB

The title of tree management’s greatest champion goes to Dunlop White.  Not only was he integral in the restoration of Old Town Club, which included significant tree removal, but he is also the keeper of the best set of resources on the subject that I found.  Visit Dunlop’s website here.

PHILADELPHIA CRICKET CLUB (WISSAHICKON)

2007 – 2014 Restoration by Keith Foster (before photo from Gib Carpenter’s wonderful article on GolfClubAtlas.com, after photo by Evan Schiller from course renovation timeline on GolfClubAtlas.com)

Photos posted to Twitter by Graylyn Loomis (@grayloomis).

PLUM HOLLOW COUNTRY CLUB

Tree removal directed by Superintendent Adam Garr.  This video illustrates perfectly the necessity for proactive tree management to ensure turf health (for more information, check out Adam’s PHCC Greens blog).

RIDEAU VIEW GOLF CLUB

2014 tree removal pics courtesy of RV member Steve Demers (on Twitter @LuckyDemers).

RIDGEWOOD COUNTRY CLUB

August 2015 tweet from the Ridgewood Grounds Dept (@RCC_Grounds).  Beautiful work across the board by Superintendent Todd Raisch and his staff.

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ROYAL CANBERRA GOLF CLUB

May 2015 Tweet from Superintendent Andrew Boyle (@Boyle_turf) highlighting OCCM work, which included improved tree management.

SLEEPY HOLLOW COUNTRY CLUB

2006-2007 Restoration by Gil Hanse and George Bahto, with subsequent additional tree removal. (pre- and post-restoration photos from course review on GolfClubAtlas.com).  For more on Sleepy Hollow, see the LinksGems Photo Tour here.

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SUN CITY COUNTRY CLUB

Renovation by Ogilvy, Clayton, Cocking and Meade.  The opening up of the property that resulted from the tree removal allowed for the combination and creation of new holes (click images for slideshow).

TPC PIPER GLEN

December 2017 Tweet from the Dept. of Agronomy (@TPCPG).  Superintendent Steffie Saffrit revealing the beautiful movement of the land more fully.

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WISCONSIN CLUB 

Under the direction of Bruce Hepner, Superintendent Mike Bremmer and his crew have been peeling away the layers of overgrowth for 7+ years.  According to Mike, “We are finally getting to the point after 750 removals where parts of the course come to light after falling one tree.  Before we had to remove what felt like 100 to see progress.”  More on Mike’s work at wisclubgrounds.blogspot.com.


ADDITIONAL TREE MANAGEMENT RESOURCES:

  • Recent Tree Removal Update by Chris Tritabaugh, Superintendent at Hazeltine National – This post from the club’s blog details reasoning and strategy behind selective off-season tree removal in preparation for the 2015 season, and 2016 Ryder Cup matches.
  • Timber! by Golf Course Architect Jeff Brauer – This column from Golf Course Industry Magazine makes a case for the benefits of thoughtful tree removal.
  • A Tree Removal Before-and-After thread on GolfClubAtlas, showing other wonderful examples of the visual impacts.
  • Why Oakmont Waged a War on Trees from the Wall Street Journal in the the run-up to the 2016 U.S. Open.
  • Below the Trees by Dunlop White, a wonderful opinion piece on GolfClubAtlas, packed with historical perspective, information, and a nice dose of sarcasm.
  • A Tree Removal List by state was created in this thread on GolfClubAtlas, and although never completed, does contain interesting removal stats.

 

 

Copyright 2017 – Jason Way, GeekedOnGolf