Geeked on Golf


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Coore & Crenshaw’s Great 18

My recent buddies trip to Boston included a visit to Old Sandwich – the seventh Coore & Crenshaw designed course that I have played.  #8 was a magical outing yesterday evening to Colorado Golf Club.

Playing C&C’s courses never fails to be a joy for me.  Their courses just look right to my eye, and they are a challenging blast to play.  The broad strokes of routing, green siting, and undulation are masterful, and the attention to the little details is always off the charts.  Their designs are packed with strategic and visual interest and yet, my buddy Shawn might have summed up best what makes their work so special while we walked down the first fairway at Old Sandwich.  He said, “Coore & Crenshaw’s holes lay so softly on the land.”  Indeed.

To express my enthusiasm, I thought it might be fun to geek out on their work and create a course of 18 of their great holes.  Picking 18 great holes seemed a little too easy though, so instead, this course will be 18 great holes, according to the actual hole numbers.  I started with the courses I have played, and then enlisted a little help from their associates David Zinkand, Keith Rhebb, and Jeff Bradley to fill in gaps and add a little flair.

What follows is what I call Coore & Crenshaw’s Great 18, but it is not meant to be definitive.  Rather, I want to hear from other C&C nuts.  Did we miss one of your favorites?  Leave your comment, or hit me up on Twitter (@JasonWay1493) or Instagram (@jwizay1493), and I’ll add yours to the mix.

CLICK ON IMAGES TO ENLARGE

#1 – Bandon Trails – Par 4 (Jeff Bradley pick) – I have been fortunate enough to play this opener on a chilly morning in October.  It demands a confident tee shot, and an even better approach.  It is an interesting dunesland tease as Trails makes its way away from the coast into a spectacular adventure through the woods.

#2 – Cabot Cliffs – Par 5 (Keith Rhebb pick, runners-up East Hampton, Talking Stick North) – From Keith’s GeekedOnGolf interview: “A lot of people think #16 is the best hole on the course.  The view from the green is stunning, but I still like the second hole best.  If you walked on #2 tee today, you probably wouldn’t realize the time and effort that went into the hole.  It was a total team effort to get it into the state that you see it now.”

#3 – Bandon Trails – Par 5 (David Zinkand pick, runner-up Colorado Golf Club) – From David’s GeekedOnGolf interview: “The par five Third Hole at Bandon Trails has a great deal of interest in its green that carries all of the way back up the hole in terms of how to attack.”

#4 – Old Sandwich – Par 3 (my pick, runner-up Warren Course) – When I walked up on to the tee of this par 3, my jaw almost hit the ground.  The green sits on the ridge naturally, and yet is also incredibly bold.  The green is huge, and so hitting it is not enough – you have to hit your tee shot in the proper section for a safe par or makable putt at birdie.

#5 – Cuscowilla – Par 4 (Jeff Bradley pick) – From Ran Morrissett’s GolfClubAtlas.com course tour: “…Coore rose to the occasion here by converting a wash area into a huge gaping bunker down what would normally have been the middle of the fairway.”

#6 – Shanqin Bay – Par 5 (David Zinkand pick, runner-up Friar’s Head) – From David’s GeekedOnGolf interview: “It was fun to build a classic Cape Hole on the Sixth at Shanqin Bay in Hainan, China.”

#7 – Bandon Preserve – Par 3 (my pick, runner-up Old Sandwich) – Truth be told, I loved playing the Preserve so much that I could have picked every one of those holes.  I settled on the seventh because of the way the green wrapped around and merged with its neighbor.  Not something you see every day!

#8 – Bandon Trails – Par 4 (Jeff Bradley pick) – Nobody does short 4s better than Coore & Crenshaw, and this hole is typically outstanding, especially in firm and fast conditions.  The lay of the land leaves options of attack open, including the ground game.

#9 – Friar’s Head – Par 4 (Jeff Bradley pick, runner-up Colorado Golf Club) – Friar’s Head is not just my favorite C&C course, it is my favorite course.  I have heard it described as the Cypress Point of the east coast, and nowhere is that feel more evident than standing on the 9th tee.  The color contrast of the dunes with the fairway running down into the green complex is simply breathtaking.  And don’t let the beauty fool you, par is a good score on this gem.

#10 – Colorado Golf Club – Par 4 (Jeff Bradley pick, runner-up WeKoPa) – I am a sucker for simple golf holes.  My favorite hole at my home course (Kingsley Club) is bunkerless, and so is the 10th at Colorado GC.  The tee shot is a thrill, and the approach is deceptively demanding.  Lose focus before the ball is in the bottom of the hole on this beauty, and you are staring an “other” in the face.

#11 – Warren Course – Par 3 (Jeff Bradley pick, runner-up Colorado Golf Club) – From the Warren Course site: “This par 3 features the largest green on the course.  Bunkers line the fairway and border the green to catch even the slightest errant shot.  Take enough club to carry the false front of the green.”

#12 – Talking Stick North – Par 4 (my pick, runner-up Dormie Club) – There are several holes at Talking Stick that use the straight property boundary to create wonderful angles off the tee.  Challenge the fence, and you are rewarded with a significantly easier approach.  Play it safe, and difficulty hitting the green awaits.  That choice is compounded on the twelfth by the wash down the middle of the hole.  No “fence sitters” allowed on this hole.

#13 – We Ko Pa Saguaro – Par 4 (my pick, runner-up Friar’s Head) – This hole is strategic golf at its most elegant, and features a wonderful Coore & Crenshaw centerline bunker.  There is no way to completely avoid peril.  So how do you want it?  On your tee shot, or on your approach?  Players who like to mindlessly whack the ball into the middle of the fairway on every hole will hate this hole, and that delights me!

#14 – Lost Farm – Par 4 (Keith Rhebb pick, runner-up Chechessee Creek) – From Keith’s GeekedOnGolf interview: “The rough contours were already within the lay of the land.  We had to tread lightly so we didn’t lose what was there in the construction process.  It turned out nicely.”

#15 – Friar’s Head – Par 4 (my pick, runner-up Streamsong Red) – Walking up the stairs from the 14th green to the 15th tee provides one of my favorite reveals in golf.  The awe turns to joy watching a well-struck drive float down the the fairway landing area, and the approach down to the green.  The joy flips right back to awe coming off the back of the 15th green to the wooden walkway overlooking Long Island Sound.  Pure magic.

#16 – Streamsong Red – Par 3 (my pick, runner-up Friar’s Head) – Everything about this hole is wild.  The visuals are wild.  The setting is wild.  The tee shot is wild.  And the green?  Get ready for a wild ride!

#17 – Chechessee Creek – Par 4 (Jeff Bradley pick, runner-up Colorado Golf Club) – From the club’s site: This short Par 4 certainly tests your courage. You can either drive over the hazard, a carry of 245 yards, or lay your ball out to the left, leaving a longer approach. The narrow green is protected on the right by two deep bunkers, but offers a generous bail-out area to the left.

#18 – Cabot Cliffs – Par 5 (my pick, runner-up Talking Stick North) – How often does a course and a hole live up to the hype?  I have not been to Cabot yet, but when I go (and I am going), I have no fear that this closer will exceed my very high expectations.

 

Copyright 2015 – Jason Way, GeekedOnGolf


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Clayts Speaks – An Interview with Architect Michael Clayton

If you are a golf nut, and you are not following Michael Clayton on Twitter (@MichaelClayto15) and/or listening to the State of the Game podcast, you really should be.  His perspectives are always informative and entertaining, and sometimes a little surly.  Best of all, he is an unapologetic defender of the spirit of this game we love, and he is working hard to channel that spirit into the golf course architecture work that he and his partners at OCCM Golf are doing.

Mike was kind enough to take time out of his busy schedule to answer my questions, which I share with you here, along with a photo tour of his firm’s work, which is fantastic.


Mike and his partners at OCCM have been involved in several high-profile projects in Australia and Tasmania, including Barnbougle Dunes, The Lakes, Bonnie Doon, and Victoria GC.  Strategic options off the tee afforded by wide fairways, varied and interesting green complexes, and attention to natural beauty are the design principles that they uphold.

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Photos by OCCM and Gary Lisbon Golf Photography

Check out the Australia & Tasmania section of the Geeked On Golf GCA Video archive for even more on OCCM’s work.


THE INTERVIEW

How did you get into the business?OCCM-SevenMileBeach

I was playing in Europe and Australia and hadn’t ever thought of doing it – but two supers/consultants – John Sloan and Bruce Grant – asked me in 1995 if I was interested in starting a company together. They thought there was room for and a need for an alternative design company in Australia.

Who is your favorite Golden Era architect, and why?

Every Australian – except Peter Thomson who would pick Harry Colt – would pick MacKenzie because he had such an influence on golf in Australia.  He came here in 1926 and transformed the game by example and education of others who would advance the game after he left.

Who has influenced you the most in your work, both within and outside of golf?

The biggest influence on my work is the combination of the best courses and the great books written on the subject – MacKenzie, Hunter, Thomas, Simpson and Wethered, Doak, Shackelford, Klein and others who have written so eloquently and sensibly on the game.  Growing up in the city of Royal Melbourne it is hard for anyone with any power of observation not to learn from the place.  Sadly many don’t.  Outside of golf?  Good question.  I need to think on that one a bit!

Describe your process for a new design.

Find the best routing.  Work out how to best get the course built and who we are going to use to help us get it done.

What should every Green Committee member study/learn before undertaking course improvement initiatives?

They should learn the basics of good design and what makes a good hole – and what contributes to a hole not reaching its potential.  They should all read at the very minimum The Spirit of St Andrews and The Anatomy of a Golf Course.

What are the primary challenges you consistently face in trying to deliver results that are up to your standards?

Those who are looking after the work after we are gone doing that job well.  It varies.  Anthony Mills has done an incredible job at The Lakes looking after our work there.  Ian Todd too at Victoria.  They get the small detail stuff all the time.

How do you know when you have hit the sweet spot in your work?

Perhaps when a hole polarizes people – you know it then has an element making it more interesting than some of the other holes.  Sometimes it’s hard to predict player reaction.  So many have such a distorted view of the role of ‘consistency’ and how ‘fair’ should be interpreted.  Fair is another word for dull.  The primary challenge of golf is dealing with its inherent unfairness and how can you make such a fickle game played over a wild 150 acre landscape ‘fair’?  The Old Course isn’t fair and that is at the heart of its greatness.

What course would you love to get your hands on for a renovation project?

RoyalCanbera-AFunny you should ask. My answer to that question in Australia has always been Royal Canberra and we are half way through the front nine now – with the back nine and the 9 hole course to finish. It’s a beautiful site and a course far from its potential.

What do you love most about practicing your craft?

Building good holes and good courses.  Making something better of an existing course – but it’s not easy dealing with the politics.  It gets tiring dealing with people who have very little idea of what constitutes good golf.  We are not perfect and don’t always get it right but I think we have a good understanding of the principles of good design.  But the average member has never read, or even thought, about the subject, but that doesn’t stop them having an opinion.

If you could only play one course for the rest of your life, what would it be, and why?

In Australia – Royal Melbourne.  In Continental Europe – Morfontaine.  Britain – Woking.  USA – NGLA.

What are the top 3 new courses on your list to play next?

Seminole, Oakmont, Ballyneal.

What do you like about playing with “throwback” equipment?

Each wooden club has its own unique feel and look.  The fun of this part of the game was the continual search for a better driver or 3 wood – and the love you had for the clubs which served you well.  Now they are more effective but they have zero character and they are disposable as soon as something ‘better’ comes along.  ‘Better’ is the latest concept of the marketing department.

When you are not playing golf or building golf courses, what are you doing?

Making sure we don’t lose contact with our friends – it’s too easy to do and a full time job in itself.  We are lucky enough to have them all over the world.

Any interesting or challenging projects in process or on the horizon for you?

Mat Goggin has an incredible piece of land just out of Hobart in Tasmania. It’s the best site I have ever seen.  Sand dunes in the pine trees on the coast.

For even more from Mike, check out this older interview on GolfClubAtlas.com.


Additional Geeked On Golf Interviews:

 

 

Copyright 2015 – GeekedOnGolf, Jason Way


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Golf Shots – An Interview with Photographer Evan Schiller

PebbleBeach18P26A quick look at my Twitter or Instagram feeds reveals that I love looking at pictures of golf courses.  Sadly, I am quite terrible at taking good pictures of the beautiful courses I get to play.  That is why I am so grateful for talented people like Evan Schiller.

In addition to being one of my favorite photographers, Evan is also a gracious and generous man.  After patiently responding to my ongoing inquiries about his work, he wisely suggested that we conduct a virtual interview.  Shared here with some of his photos are insights about the practice of his craft.  Hope you enjoy.

(Although it is selling quickly, there are a few copies of Evan’s 2015 Golf Shots Calendar available here, along with his other work.)

CLICK ON ANY IMAGE TO OPEN THE GALLERY

How did you get into the profession?

To make a somewhat long story short…my parents gave me what is an equivalent these days to a point and shoot when I was about 8…I just started taking photos of everything, especially on our vacations…..about 17 years laters, I was playing the 9th hole of The Stadium Course at PGA WEST in 1986 and as we walked down the fairway in the early morning the scene was breathtaking.  My friend and I had just played in the California Open in August in the Palm Spring area..yes, a bit hot.  I wished I had a camera with me to capture it.  No cell phones in those days.  Upon returning home I purchased a camera and started taking it with me on trips.  I would give the photos to friends and hang them on my wall.  Several years later while working as an assistant professional at Westchester Country Club a friend of mine said I should put some of the photos in the pro shop and sell them.  Well,…..I did and here we are.  One thing lead to another and I was off and running.

Describe your process for capturing the perfect shot.

This is a bit long, but I think it speaks to what you are asking. Where I shoot depends on which holes are most photogenic, of course.  However, I usually try to scout the course beforehand to look beyond that.  I want to see nuances and anticipate light patterns on specific holes so that I know where to stand for the critical moment when the sun rises and sets. I’ve captured beautiful shots without scouting the course, but it’s not ideal.  Why?  Because of the light.  It takes some time to understand the timing and angle of the sun’s rays on each fairway and green.  Taking the time to consider this can make the difference between capturing a good shot and a great one.

Let’s take Pebble Beach for instance. I know from experience that I must capture #8 and #18 as soon as the sun comes over the mountains or the sun will be too high and the light less than optimal.  I might position myself behind the 8th green in a cherry picker well before sunrise so I’m ready for the opportunity at first light. Not to say I won’t get a good shot after sunrise, but the hole won’t show me its best.

From my scouting preparation, I know that from the 8th hole I can head to the 6th and 7th because it takes longer for the sun to appropriately light those holes.  If I’ve done my prep well, I’ll have noticed that the light on #9 and #10 is likely better in the late afternoon and that the 7th hole faces almost due south so it photographs well in morning and afternoon light, although I prefer the evening!

Once I’ve identified the holes and times I want to shoot, I turn my attention to composing the shot, keeping in mind that it might be viewed on a computer screen, in a magazine, a book or as a framed print.  I always intend to create a shot where everything flows and is of interest, while keeping in mind balance and eye appeal.  So while it’s not a rule, I generally don’t photograph from the middle of a fairway. Unless there’s something interesting at play like a fairway bunker or shadow, it’s not the most intriguing shot.

So preparing to photograph a course is more than a logistical run-through.  It’s an opportunity to see beyond just looking.  It’s seeing with my imagination to anticipate the flow of light and capture its shimmer within finite time frames.

This may be where the art of photography lies.

What is your most memorable moment while working on a shoot?  

Wow, that’s a tough one!!  See below when I write about shooting the 7th at Pebble Beach.  A couple other times were when I was first asked to go photograph The Masters for Golf Digest and The Masters Journal and, the week before asked to shoot the course for Golf Magazine.  Now that I think of it, in 2001 I was asked by a notable publisher if I wanted to be the photographer of a book entitled “Golf Courses of Hawaii”.  Not knowing at the moment what was required of course I said yes.  Well, I soon found out that it would require me to go to Hawaii for about 8 – 10 weeks to photograph 40 golf courses….At the time I thought I was in heaven but still alive!!  I ended up making two trips to Hawaii and spending a total of about 9 weeks there shooting….tough duty.

What are the Top 3 courses you want to shoot?

Another good one. I’m assuming this means courses I have not photographed before?  Off the top of my head Cabot Links, Barndougle Dunes in Tasmania looks amazing, Cape Kidnappers in New Zealand and if I could add one more it would be Sand Hills in Nebraska.

How do you know when you have hit the sweet spot and captured a special picture?  

It’s usually the convergence of a series of events.  A great hole / shot / beauty….great light and cloud formations.  And, I just know it.  Things are different now with digital cameras and backs.  Ten years ago when I was shooting film you didn’t know what you had until you got the film back.  Now you know instantaneously when you look at the image in the back of the camera.  For instance, the attached, which by the way was shot with film.  It’s a photo of the 7th at Pebble Beach.  I had arrived about two hours before sunset and sat around waiting on an overcast day….hoping for the marine layer to break.  I never know when that special moment will occur, I can try and anticipate it based on past experiences and be ready if and when it does.  So, I waited almost two hours for this shot and just before the sunset there was a break in the clouds by the horizon and the sun came out for less than two minutes and I was able to capture a few shots.  I could even say this was one of the more memorable shots because of the place and the fact this has been one of my most popular images ever.  It also appeared on the cover of the 2010 US Open Magazine which was play at Pebble Beach.

Pebble-Beach-Golf-Links_7th-Hole---

What do you love about practicing your craft?  

Many things…first of all, I have the opportunity to travel to some amazing places and courses and not only photograph them, but sometimes play them.  I meet so many wonderful people along the way as well.  I love to share my images and experiences of shooting because often times I am out on a golf course when other people are not.  Usually very early or late.  I also love the adventure (scouting courses, shooting from lifts and helicopters and recently with drones and being out early in the morning when the sunrises…. and the creativity of it all, looking and seeing what’s the best angle for shooting the hole…I never know what’s going to happen or what I’ll find along the way and I like that…I like being surprised.

Who is your favorite golf course architect, and why?  

Tough to choose one there, so many architects are doing such great work, many of whom we are only now getting to know.

What are your favorite courses to play?

This is probably the easiest question.  Royal County Down, Fishers Island, Punta Espada and Pacific Dunes.

When you’re not taking pictures, what are you doing? 

My wife and I have also made numerous trips to Africa and have become fundraisers for the conservation of Big Cats.  We’ve done several fundraisers over the past few years for Panthera (http://www.panthera.org/) and The Big Cats Initiative. (http://animals.nationalgeographic.com/animals/big-cats-initiative/)  We love Africa and I’ve taken thousands of photos during our trips.

I’m also a golf professional and coach with Extraordinary Golf. (http://www.extraordinarygolf.com/) and, love to hang out and photograph our three cats.

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Additional Geeked On Golf Interviews:

 

 

Copyright 2015 – Jason Way, GeekedOnGolf