Geeked on Golf


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MORE MUSINGS ON GREATNESS

While listening to a podcast with Ron Whitten, long-time architecture editor with Golf Digest, I was struck by how similar his early experience of falling in love with the game’s playing fields was to my own. In his youth, Whitten visited both Canal Shores (then known by another name) and Chicago Golf Club. Each course delighted him in a different way, and caused in him a revelation that would launch his career – there exists a wondrous variety of golf courses to explore.

Ron Whitten’s experience resonates with me because it mirrors my own, and that of my two sons. I learned the game playing with my dad and grandfather at the course on the old Fort Sheridan Army base in Highland Park, IL. Soon after, I began a ten year stretch of caddying at the Old Elm Club, a Harry Colt design built by a young Donald Ross – a true architectural gem. I played many other courses during my younger days, but Fort Sheridan and Old Elm were my favorites. For me, although they resided at completely different ends of the spectrum in terms of pedigree and conditioning, they were both intensely interesting in their own way. With the minds and hands of both Harry Colt and Donald Ross involved, the greatness of Old Elm is inherently obvious. Fort Sheridan wound through a military base past tanks and cannons, on the parade grounds and over ravines – what could be cooler for a little boy? Fast forward and I now split time with my sons between Canal Shores and Kingsley Club, each interesting in its own unique way.

The subject of what defines greatness in golf course architecture is one that I covered previously in my 108 in 48 post. There is a broader category of “good” into which great courses like those fall, with a much simpler definition informed by my experience. A good course is one that is interesting enough to make me want to play it again. This definition is inclusive of both ends of the spectrum, and tends to be exclusive of courses in the middle. Life is too short to spend precious golf time (and dollars) on the bland, the boring, or the just plain bad. I would rather hold out for those courses that get my gears turning with quirk, interesting details, or unique surroundings.

Exploring the ends of the spectrum and sharing those stories will be the focus of Geeked On Golf going forward. Chime in and share your experiences. It is always a pleasure to connect with kindred spirits.

Copyright 2019 – Jason Way, GeekedOnGolf